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Listening deeply requires these five pre-conditioning steps

Listening deeply requires these 5 pre-conditioning steps to be practiced

As a leadership coach, I often work with clients who are looking to improve their communication skills and deepen their relationships with their team members, colleagues, and other stakeholders.

One of the most important skills in this area is deep listening, which involves not just hearing the words being spoken, but also understanding the underlying emotions, needs, and motivations behind them. However, deep listening is not always easy, and it requires practice and preparation.

That’s why I recommend these five pre-conditioning steps to help my clients become better listeners:

 

Step 1: Conduct a 2-minute mindfulness check-in

Before you start listening to someone, take a few minutes to focus your mind and calm your thoughts. A mindfulness check-in can help you become present and focused before you start listening. To do this, find a quiet space where you won’t be interrupted, sit comfortably, and close your eyes.

Take a few deep breaths and focus on your breath, noticing the sensation of the air moving in and out of your body. If your mind starts to wander, gently bring your attention back to your breath. You can do this for as little as two minutes or as long as you like. The goal is to become centered and calm before you begin listening.

As a leadership coach, I encourage my clients to practice mindfulness regularly, as it can help reduce stress, improve focus, and enhance overall well-being. By incorporating a 2-minute mindfulness check-in before each conversation, leaders can improve their listening skills and build stronger relationships with their team members and colleagues.

A leadership coach can help you conduct a 2-minute mindfulness check-in by providing guidance and support as you develop your mindfulness practice. Here are some ways a leadership coach can help:

  • Teach mindfulness techniques:

A leadership coach can introduce you to different mindfulness techniques, such as breathing exercises, body scans, or guided meditations, and help you find a technique that works best for you.

  • Set goals and track progress:

A leadership coach can help you set goals for your mindfulness practice and track your progress over time. They can also help you identify any challenges or barriers to mindfulness and suggest strategies for overcoming them.

  • Foster self-awareness:

Mindfulness can help you develop greater self-awareness, which is an important skill for effective leadership. A leadership coach can help you reflect on your thoughts and emotions during your mindfulness practice and identify patterns or habits that might be getting in the way of your effectiveness.

  • Incorporate mindfulness into leadership development:

A leadership coach can help you incorporate mindfulness into your overall leadership development plan by identifying opportunities to practice mindfulness throughout your day, such as during meetings or when communicating with team members.

“In today’s rush, we all think too much — seek too much — want too much —

and forget about the joy of just being.”

– Eckhart Tolle

 

Step 2: Remove the distractions

Distractions can interfere with your ability to listen deeply, so it is important to eliminate them before you start listening. Distractions can take many forms, including phone notifications, email alerts, noisy environments, or visual clutter.

To remove distractions, try turning off your phone or putting it on silent, closing your office door, or finding a quiet space where you won’t be interrupted. If you’re in a noisy environment, you might try using noise-canceling headphones or finding a quieter spot.

The goal is to create a focused environment where you can give your full attention to the person you’re listening to.

As a leadership coach, I often work with clients who struggle with time management and productivity. By eliminating distractions and creating a focused environment for deep listening, leaders can improve their efficiency and effectiveness in their work.

A leadership coach can help you remove distractions by identifying the specific distractions that are getting in the way of your ability to listen deeply and suggesting strategies for managing them. Here are some ways a leadership coach can help:

  • Identify distractions:

A leadership coach can help you identify the specific distractions that are most likely to interfere with your listening, such as a noisy work environment, a busy schedule, or distracting thoughts or emotions.

  • Develop strategies for removing distractions:

Once you’ve identified the specific distractions, a leadership coach can help you develop strategies for removing them. For example, if a noisy work environment is distracting you, a leadership coach might suggest finding a quieter place to work or using noise-canceling headphones. If a busy schedule is getting in the way of your ability to listen, a leadership coach might suggest scheduling dedicated time for listening or delegating tasks to free up your schedule.

  • Develop active listening skills:

Developing active listening skills, such as maintaining eye contact and nodding to show engagement, can help you stay focused on the conversation and minimize the impact of distractions. A leadership coach can help you practice these skills and provide feedback on how to improve.

“Deep listening is miraculous for both listener and speaker.

When someone receives us with open-hearted, non-judging, intensely interested listening, our spirits expand.”

 – Sue Patton Thoele

 

Step 3: Drink water

 Staying hydrated is important for maintaining focus and mental clarity, so make sure to drink water before you start listening. This will help you stay alert and engaged throughout the conversation. Dehydration can lead to fatigue, brain fog, and reduced cognitive function, so it’s important to stay hydrated throughout the day.

To make sure you’re getting enough water, try keeping a water bottle on your desk or setting reminders to drink water throughout the day. The goal is to stay hydrated and alert so that you can listen deeply.

As a leadership coach, I often emphasize the importance of self-care and well-being for effective leadership. By prioritizing hydration and other self-care practices, leaders can improve their ability to listen deeply and communicate effectively with their team members and colleagues.

 

Step 4: Take three deep breaths

 Deep breathing can help reduce stress and anxiety, which can interfere with your ability to listen deeply. Before you start listening, take three deep breaths to help calm your mind and body. To do this, take a deep breath in through your nose, hold it for a few seconds, and then exhale slowly through your mouth. Repeat this two more times.

The goal is to reduce any tension or anxiety you might be feeling and to create a calm and receptive state of mind.

As a leadership coach, I often work with clients who struggle with anxiety and stress in their roles. By incorporating deep breathing exercises into their daily routine, leaders can improve their ability to manage stress and maintain focus during challenging conversations.

A leadership coach can help you take three deep breaths by teaching you specific breathing techniques and helping you integrate them into your daily routine. Here are some ways a leadership coach can help:

  • Teach breathing techniques:

A leadership coach can introduce you to different breathing techniques, such as deep belly breathing or alternate nostril breathing, and help you find a technique that works best for you. They can also help you practice these techniques until they become a habit.

  • Provide accountability:

A leadership coach can help you stay accountable to your breathing practice by checking in regularly and providing encouragement and support.

  • Foster self-awareness:

Mindful breathing can help you develop greater self-awareness, which is an important skill for effective leadership. A leadership coach can help you reflect on your thoughts and emotions during your breathing practice and identify patterns or habits that might be getting in the way of your effectiveness.

“Effective communication is about connecting with people,

not just conveying information.”

– Unknown

 

Step 5: Check your body language

Your body language can communicate a lot about your level of engagement and interest in the conversation. Make sure to maintain good eye contact, sit or stand up straight, and avoid fidgeting or other distracting behaviors. This will show the speaker that you are fully present and interested in what they have to say.

You might also try nodding your head or making other affirmative gestures to show that you’re listening and engaged. The goal is to show the speaker that you’re fully present and interested in what they have to say.

As a leadership coach, I often work with clients on developing their interpersonal skills, including body language and nonverbal communication. By practicing good body language during conversations, leaders can improve their ability to connect with their team members and colleagues and build stronger relationships.

A leadership coach can help you improve your body language by providing feedback, teaching you specific techniques, and helping you become more aware of your nonverbal cues. Here are some ways a leadership coach can help:

  • Provide feedback:

A leadership coach can observe your body language and provide specific feedback on how it might be perceived by others. For example, they might notice that you tend to slouch or avoid eye contact, which can convey disinterest or lack of confidence. By providing this feedback, a leadership coach can help you become more aware of your nonverbal cues and how they might be impacting your communication.

  • Teach specific techniques:

A leadership coach can teach you specific techniques for improving your body language, such as standing tall, maintaining eye contact, or using hand gestures to emphasize key points. They can also help you practice these techniques until they become a habit.

  • Help you become more aware of your nonverbal cues:

A leadership coach can help you become more aware of your nonverbal cues by having you practice mindfulness exercises, such as body scans or meditation. By becoming more attuned to your body and your physical sensations, you can become more aware of your nonverbal cues and how they might be impacting your communication.

  • Role-play situations:

A leadership coach can help you practice using effective body language in different situations by role-playing scenarios with you. For example, they might have you practice giving a presentation or conducting a difficult conversation while paying close attention to your body language.

  • Help you understand cultural differences:

Body language can vary widely across cultures, and a leadership coach can help you understand how your nonverbal cues might be interpreted by people from different cultural backgrounds. By becoming more culturally competent, you can communicate more effectively with a diverse range of stakeholders.

“Mindfulness is a way of befriending ourselves and our experience.”

– Jon Kabat-Zinn

 

Conclusion

Deep listening is a critical skill for effective leadership, and it requires practice and preparation. By incorporating these five pre-conditioning steps into their daily routine, leaders can improve their ability to listen deeply, communicate effectively, and build stronger relationships with their team members and colleagues.

As a leadership coach, I encourage my clients to prioritize these practices and make deep listening a habit for success in their roles.

 

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