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ET-089: A conversation with Mr. Ken Attard

ET-089: A conversation with Mr. Ken Attard

and your host Wayne Brown on February 20, 2024

and your host Wayne Brown on February 20, 2024

Episode notes: A conversation with Mr. Ken Attard

Hello and welcome to the ET Project. I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and as usual, we’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET.

Today, I’m about to tick off another item on my bucket list, well, at least on my virtual bucket list, as I’m sitting and chatting with our guest, Canadian born and 45-year resident on the island of Malta, Mr. Ken Attard. As I’m keen on visiting exotic locations, and in this instance, both my wife and I share a similar desire to visit Malta, and so we’re excited to mark this as our first step.

I’ve already joked with Ken that he’d best ready himself for a couple of unannounced guests to show up at some time in the near future. All right, allow me to introduce Mr. Ken Attard. He’s the founder of Mindset Malta. After successfully working with various clients over a span of 15 years, Ken now specializes as a mindset consultant, specifically helping frustrated entrepreneurs shift their mindset to create the results that they desire.

Here is an extract from our conversation as we start to get into it…

When I look back, I think one of the biggest challenges was potentially falling into perception because at the time, so we’re going way back to 1985, and that was considered quite a at the time somewhat of a prestigious job here. It was somewhat of a cushy job in the sense that it was fairly well-paid. You had pretty good hours and it could have been very easy to fall back into the perception that this is going to be forever. This is a job forever, which was pretty well the mindset of many people at that time. So when I look back, I think that was one of the challenges that I could have easily fell into. With regards to the job, one of the challenges that I found that made me actually move out was I just felt like there was more out there. I just felt like it was a really slow progression…

Today’s Guest: MR KEN ATTARD

Without doubt one of Ken’s biggest passions in life, and that he brings to the stage through his personal experiences, is his work as a mindset consultant, and also being an entrepreneur, a father, and a human being just like the rest of us on this planet.

You’ll find his fun and easygoing manner come through during our conversation in the way he conveys his message, which allows you to feel at ease, to be empowered, and ultimately to get the results you want.

He’s also the author of the Consumer Educational Guide, How to Step into the Magic of the Successful Entrepreneur Now, plus he’s co-author of the international bestselling book, Making Waves. He’s regularly featured on local television, has been a guest on over 20 international podcasts, and is a dynamic keynote speaker. Ken shares a number of fascinating antidotes and tools that he’s developed during his career, and you’ll hear us unpack these during our conversation

Final words from Ken:

I actually like to finish a lot of my videos with this and remind myself. And this is what I say to you. I say it first, enjoy your journey. It’s all about enjoying and having fun throughout that journey. And when you can find the joy in that journey, irrespective of the results that are coming. And that’s part of the freedom as well. And that’s really what I consider true success as well is when even when you’re swaying through the difficult moments, you can still be enjoying it. And that takes practice like anything else.

And then ultimately, what I like to say is this, remember to laugh a lot, lot more, especially when you can laugh at yourself…

Transcript:

0:00:04.6 WB: Hello, I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and welcome to the ET Project. We’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world, whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET. And today, I’m about to tick off another item on my bucket list, well, at least on my virtual bucket list, as I’m sitting and chatting with our guest, Canadian born and 45-year resident on the island of Malta, Mr. Ken Attard. As I’m keen on visiting exotic locations, and in this instance, both my wife and I share a similar desire to visit Malta, and so we’re excited to mark this as our first step. I’ve already joked with Ken that he’d best ready himself for a couple of unannounced guests to show up at some time in the near future. All right, allow me to introduce Mr. Ken Attard. He’s the founder of Mindset Malta. After successfully working with various clients over a span of 15 years, Ken now specializes as a mindset consultant, specifically helping frustrated entrepreneurs shift their mindset to create the results that they desire.

0:01:13.0 WB: This is without doubt one of his biggest passions in life, and he brings to the stage his personal experiences not only as a mindset consultant, but also as an entrepreneur, a father, and a human being just like the rest of us on this planet. You’ll find his fun and easygoing manner come through during our conversation in the way he conveys his message, which allows you to feel at ease, to be empowered, and ultimately to get the results you want. He’s also the author of the Consumer Educational Guide, How to Step into the Magic of the Successful Entrepreneur Now, plus he’s co-author of the international bestselling book, Making Waves. He’s regularly featured on local television, has been a guest on over 20 international podcasts, and is a dynamic keynote speaker. Ken shares a number of fascinating antidotes and tools that he’s developed during his career, and you’ll hear us unpack these during our conversation. Team ET, as always, we do our best to bring you a wealth of insights, so let’s dive into this episode with our guest, Mr. Ken Attard, as we explore tricks and strategies for confronting and harnessing our mindset.

0:02:30.8 Speaker 2: Welcome to the ET Project, a podcast for those executive talents determined to release their true potential and create an impact. Join our veteran coach and mentor, Wayne Brown, as we unpack an exciting future together.

0:02:47.5 WB: All right, well, welcome to the ET Project, where we’re aiming today to delve into the pivotal theme of mastering your mindset as both a leader and an entrepreneur in this crazy business world we find ourselves in at the moment. And so I’m really pleased to welcome today to our show, Mr. Ken Attard. Ken is a mindset consultant. Together, we’re going to explore how cultivating a growth-oriented mindset can drive innovation, foster effective leadership, as well as navigate a few complexities. So Ken, welcome to the ET Project. Great to have you.

0:03:26.0 KA: Thank you so much, Wayne. I truly am excited to be here.

0:03:30.6 WB: Before we get into too deep into the conversation, there’s a few things we’ve spoken about before we hit record and in our previous conversation. The first is that you’re sitting in Malta. Now, Malta just happens to be on my bucket list of locations where I must go before I say farewell to this physical presence. What I’d love for you to do, if you don’t mind, is put on your best tourist guides cap and this small slice of wonder for our audience about what is Malta, where is it, and what brings you there.

0:04:10.0 KA: Yeah, absolutely. I agree with you 100%. It many times has been described as a gem in the Mediterranean. We’re bang in the middle of the Mediterranean Sea, to give you an idea, let’s say 60 miles south of Sicily. It literally is, when you look at the map of the world, it’s really in the center. I’m originally born in Canada, yet my parents are both Maltese and my dad decided to head back to Malta. I was 14 at the time. I think my dad decided he wanted to go where the sun shines 300 days a year. He wanted to get back. I’ve been here for 45 years. Without a doubt, I love it. It’s funny, it’s a 120 square mile island with a sister island that is actually called Gozo, which is actually half of that size, so it’s about 60 square miles. I like to get there as well. It’s a tremendous way to get away, believe it or not, a quick ferry ride.

0:05:20.2 KA: It’s amazing weather. There’s a ton of history on the island. It’s Mediterranean culture, so it is a bit of a slower pace than a lot of larger metropolitan cities. I’m not saying that the pace is 100% slow. I think that’s still up to the individual to make sure that happens and we can delve into that as well. Yet, it really is, to me, a magnificent place where I can call a friend up in 15 minutes, be at a cafe, sipping a cappuccino or an espresso and having a chat. And it’s also. In my world now, it’s also a great place to work because since I can work from anywhere I want, sometimes I find myself by the seaside on my laptop doing some consulting or coaching, literally, where someone considers it would be like a dream holiday. Sometimes I have to remind myself of that and go, this is pretty amazing.

0:06:23.7 WB: Come on. That’s enough of the rubbish. Come on. You can’t work in that environment. That’s not possible. Now, I also believe you speak Maltese.

0:06:37.9 KA: I do.

0:06:39.9 WB: Very nice.

0:06:41.6 KA: I do. And let me make this very clear because we talk about adapting and shifting. When I moved here, when I was 14, I did not know Maltese. Although my parents were both Maltese, because we were in Canada, we were very adamant that I obviously learned the English language well. So when I came here, that was one of the challenges that I did have to face and I had to learn the Maltese. Although I must say that people do recognize that there is an accent there, even when I’m speaking in Maltese, so they’ll know that, hey, where did you used to live or whatever it is, but I can speak it and understand it 100%.

0:07:22.6 WB: I think I even made the comment that I don’t pick up any accent. You’ve been there 45 years and I can’t pick up any European accent whatsoever.

0:07:33.7 KA: Yeah. It’s pretty predominant. It’s just there. I think I mentioned this. My daughter, who’s 31, sometimes turns to me and says, isn’t it time you lost that accent? [laughter] And I’m like. It’s not me, man. It’s there. It’s ingrained.

0:07:52.9 WB: It’s incredible. All right. Well, let’s jump into a little bit about career, I guess. You started your main career, I guess, in banking and you were there about seven years.

0:08:05.6 KA: Correct.

0:08:06.7 WB: We all know that banking can be a really demanding environment. The question that came to mind was what sort of challenges did you face? 

0:08:12.9 KA: When I look back, I think one of the biggest challenges was potentially falling into perception because at the time, so we’re going way back to 1985, and that was considered quite a at the time somewhat of a prestigious job here. It was somewhat of a cushy job in the sense that it was fairly well-paid. You had pretty good hours and it could have been very easy to fall back into the perception that this is going to be forever. This is a job forever, which was pretty well the mindset of many people at that time. So when I look back, I think that was one of the challenges that I could have easily fell into. With regards to the job, one of the challenges that I found that made me actually move out was I just felt like there was more out there. I just felt like it was a really slow progression.

0:09:17.3 KA: It was very much based at the time on seniority. It was only over a due course of period of time where you could move up the ladder, if you’d like to call it. That just got somewhat frustrating, I would say. The job per se, I enjoyed. I have to say one of the things that was a turn for me at the time was, because we’re going back so far, that smoking was allowed in banks and I couldn’t handle it. It really used to bother me at times. But challenges with regards to work, I can’t say that there were huge challenges because the language was there already then. I wanted to grow more. I wanted to really pursue other stuff that I thought was going to take me in a different direction.

0:10:08.2 WB: That’s a great segue. You transitioned from banking into, I believe, retail selling when you were there for…

0:10:15.9 KA: No, not retail. Actually, wholesale selling first. I moved into a company. I was selling to retail outlets, so it was wholesale. Yeah. I moved into sales with a company, a predominant company here. So they still are a predominant company here and learned a ton. I spent three years with the company. And again, it’s interesting because I came to another point where I said I didn’t want to remain a sales rep. And again, I took a bit of a gamble. I remember when I moved from banking into this new job sales, I went to a lesser basic pay. I went to a less basic pay. I knew I had the potential of commission. I knew it was a well-renowned company. So I said, the chances of me not being able to sell at all, it’s going to be, I’d really have to be doing a really bad job in a car and this type of stuff. Yet, I also moved at the time taking that risk, if you want to call it, or that leap of faith. At the time, my wife at the time was actually pregnant as well.

0:11:29.2 KA: There was a lot of change at that time. Moving into a new job, not being 100% certain how it’s going to work out. I spent three years there. I came to a point, like I said, where I said, I wanted to move up again, potentially into a sales manager job, and then potentially move up within the company. I just didn’t see those opportunities happening. I just saw doors within the company being closed at the time. And then I had a friend of mine who had a small company who contacted me and had an opportunity where I could move into something. I was still going to be in sales, but it was a much smaller company. It was just literally building it up. So I was going to be much more heavily involved. Then eventually with that company became a director of the company as well. It continued on sales and learning other aspects of entrepreneurship, if you’d like to say as well. That’s how I moved out of that sales job and then remained with this other company until I actually moved into what you just mentioned was retail sales. I had a couple of shops then as well. I moved into that.

0:12:39.1 WB: You mentioned that the selling role, you learned so much. I’m curious, what is it that you took out of that experience? What are some of the things that have stayed with you? 

0:12:51.4 KA: Oh, wow. I would say understanding more than ever how important it is to build relationships, to understand about rapport building, understand about sales as well and how that functions and how that works. Again, I bring it back nowadays more and more to those solid relationships, building those relationships, gaining that trust without a doubt. When I was more heavily involved in this smaller company, I was learning about forecasts and budgeting and importation at the time because we were bringing in some products and this type of stuff as well. Those were a lot of responsibility. The responsibility and the accountability that we have to whatever we’re building and ultimately to ourselves. I think this is very key as well for anybody listening here when we talk about mindset is the accountability with yourself and being willing to be honest with yourself and look at where you are and where you want to go. These were all aspects that I learned throughout that also learned a lot of stuff that I didn’t want to do. I saw things that I saw. I said, wow, this is stuff I really don’t want to do. I learned what not to do as well. That was really cool as well.

0:14:20.7 WB: You then move into retail and you start buying or opening shops yourself. What was the catalyst though? How did you get to that point of saying what, I’m enjoying the sales, but it’s still not just enough for me for whatever reason? Was there a tipping point? 

0:14:39.9 KA: Yes, there definitely was a tipping point. I was involved in the sales and within that company itself as well. I was involved in a retail shop within that company as well. I had learned a lot about that business. The tipping point for me was, as I was saying before, there were a few things that I was seeing that I didn’t like and the way they were being done within the company that didn’t resonate with me. At that point in time, I wasn’t delving into personal development the way I did a few years later. Yet, looking back, I can see how certain values were being compromised within that company. That was the catalyst for me to say what, I got to move out and I got to do something completely on my own. That was definitely the catalyst.

0:15:32.1 WB: You did that to a T where you start your own businesses, but not just one. You actually opened several shops, if I understood correctly, over a six-year period or something.

0:15:44.9 KA: Yes, exactly. I basically opened three shops over a period of about six years exactly, which again, I learned a lot. I also look back and I understand what potentially I did that was not correct and opening so quickly because essentially, when I look at it, I know that I was undercapitalized at that point in time. And this was a bit of a… Created a bit of a challenge without a doubt amongst many other things. As I had mentioned to you, I had opened my first shop in August 2000. It was a great year. It was a phenomenal year for that. It was a souvenir shop and I had a great turnover. I was really happy with how things were going. I began to employ some people. Rather than being in the shop all the time myself, I was able to employ people as well to be there. In 2001, we were hit with Twin Towers, which changed travel completely, changed tourism at least for a while completely. Again, this is where I started to learn about adapting and pivoting. And by that time, I had started to delve into personal development, which helped me to get through that period of time without a doubt to shift things.

0:17:10.8 WB: Is there anything that you take away from that time that you still think, gosh, if I only had that hindsight now or back then, I would have done this? 

0:17:21.1 KA: Yeah, absolutely. There is something and I think this is really important for entrepreneurs to understand as well. It’s about attachment in the sense that I look back and I know that potentially, because then I obviously ended up closing my shops. Well, there’s one particular shop, the first shop that I had actually opened, which I considered being the entrepreneur or whatever you want to call it. This is my baby. I really wanted to make it and I wanted to survive and all this. There was a sense of attachment to that. I actually hung on to that shop probably for two years more than I needed to hold on to it. That’s one of the big takeaways I took from there is that when you look at something and you see that, okay, what can I do to make it work? You do everything that you can to make it work and it’s still not working for some reason. You got to be willing to say, okay, I’m ready to let this go and not be too attached to it and say, okay, there’s more stuff waiting for me. And to be able to release that energy so that the new energy can come in, because I think what happens a lot of times is people hang on to that and they’re really just closing up the energy to allow new, really good energy to come in.

0:18:41.0 KA: So, to me that was one of the biggest takeaways that I got from that period in time as well. And understanding that things do change and embracing that change rather than resisting it.

0:18:58.5 WB: Well, let’s jump into your business now, Ken. We’re at that point now. So maybe you can just introduce your business and what you’re doing at the moment, and then we’ll start to unpack some of the tools and the techniques and the methodology that you use when you work with your clients related to mindset.

0:19:14.6 KA: Sure, absolutely. In a nutshell, I help frustrated entrepreneurs to adapt and pivot their mindset. And using what I call a proprietary Arc method, they are able to move towards what I like to call true freedom. Because what I have discovered over the years as well in working with entrepreneurs is that for the most part, when I ask entrepreneurs why is it that they started their own business, what was the catalyst for them to start their own business, a lot of them simply wanted more freedom.

0:19:55.6 KA: Now, a lot of them may potentially look at financial freedom. The two main ones a lot of times are the financial freedom and what they think is the time freedom. Those two combined are not the only things that are a part of true freedom. Yet many an entrepreneur, and some of those listening may be able to identify with this, go down a rabbit hole that finds them not having the financial freedom that they want yet, and also actually being totally absorbed with their time in their business. That they actually come back and say to me, they don’t have time for anything else.

0:20:43.7 WB: Before we get too deep into some of the tools, just to let the listener know, your company is Mindset Malta. And I believe you have a number of products like the Mindset Choice, the Inside Lane, and Cruising Clarity. Do you just want to introduce those quickly and then? 

0:21:04.2 KA: Sure. Absolutely. Absolutely. So I love it. So believe it or not, I actually started with the Inside Lane. The Inside Lane was, or it still is, is actually a 12-month program. It’s a 12-month program. And the Inside Lane is simply because it is all about the inside work. And what, again we’re talking about the byproduct of the results, the experiences that you’re having are a reflection of what’s going on on the inside. So talking about beliefs and how you’re, so it’s a reflection.

0:21:42.3 KA: So the Inside Lane is like a 12 month program which involves a video every week with a particular lesson, with home play. I like to call it home play. It is not homework. I think people have enough work to do. Let’s call it play. Let’s play a little more in our lives. I think this is really important to understand and have fun, whether you’re an entrepreneur. And everybody really is an entrepreneur, I consider, because we’re in this business called life. So, everybody really and truly is an entrepreneur.

0:22:12.6 KA: And so every week there’s a lesson, there’s this home play. There’s also one-to-one interaction. And so this is what the Inside Lane is really, and I did it on purpose. I did a 12 month program because I want people to get long-term results. I think a lot of people think that you’re, I don’t know. You listen to, let me exaggerate. You listen to one podcast and you’ve understood everything about mindset. It’s an ongoing process, man. I’ve been delving for 20 years plus. It’s an ongoing process. You’re continuously learning.

0:22:46.8 KA: So this is why I wanted to do something that would go in depth and the idea is to keep mindset top of mind every single week, not every single, as much as possible, keeping mindset. Okay, I’ve got another lesson this week. I’ve got another lesson this week. So it starts to involve consistency. It involves dedication. It involves repetition because that’s how you learn as well. So it starts to delve into many of these things.

0:23:15.3 KA: So after I had created that, and then I decided that I wanted to create something that was a little shorter as well. And simply because I did recognize there are a lot of people, there’s a lot of individuals out there, they’re not willing to dedicate a full year. They’re not willing. And nowadays, more than ever sometimes we can’t even dedicate a whole minute to watch a video. [laughter] People get to, it’s amazing. I keep hearing this, right? It used to be a minute and 30 seconds. Now it’s gone down to a minute. Now it’s gone down to 30 seconds. It’s like anyways, to capture people’s attention.

0:23:50.7 KA: So I created a program. And this program actually came out of, besides the fact that I wanted to create something a little shorter. The Cruising to Clarity came about because I do what I call breakthrough sessions as well. Every so often I do breakthrough sessions. I offer a breakthrough session for individuals. And I literally sit down, like I actually do it, I do it for free. So I’ll sit down with them. I just guarantee them that by the end of it, they’re going to have a breakthrough.

0:24:17.9 KA: And I sit down with them between an hour and a half and two hours I do this. And I limit it very much. Like I’ll take only a certain amount every month, for instance, with a breakthrough session. It’s a very limited amount. But I’ll sit down with them. And what I noticed with these breakthrough sessions, there was a very common thread for many. And it was that they had ideas, they wanted to build something. They just didn’t have the clarity on how to potentially move forward with it, especially when it came to understanding about their values, understanding about what a well-formed goal is.

0:24:56.6 KA: So I said you know what? This is really interesting. There’s a common thread here. I’m going to create a program about clarity. And the program on clarity is based on building blocks. So it’s an eight-week program. Now, I say it’s an eight-week program. I actually give people the option to spend a whole year going through it. Why did I do that? Because I want you to have fun doing it. I want you to enjoy the process of going through the program. The last thing I want to do is put even more pressure on you to have to go through this program in eight weeks. And because I truly believe if you do it diligently, you’re gonna want more time to do it.

0:25:43.9 KA: So again, it involves videos, it involves eight building blocks, things like accessing your true freedom and keys to your success and decisions based on values. These are all different building blocks within the program. They have the home play as well and there’s written work to do as well. And again, they interact with me as well. Even those who choose to do it over a year, I’ll interact with them one-to-one four times throughout the year. Again, so we’re sitting down, we’re looking at where they’re going, where they feel they’re still a bit stuck, if you’d like to say, and how we’re going to move forward.

0:26:19.4 KA: And so that is another key program. And something that I really want to emphasize as well on for myself is I like to work with… I’m not looking in all honesty, I’m not looking to have thousands and thousands of clients. I’m looking to have a nice core of clients who really want to work together and want to work together long-term, so that both of us can grow together. So I can help you to grow together and we build up that relationship that we were talking about before, that trust, so that we can continue to move forward together.

0:27:00.6 KA: So someone from Cruising to Clarity might decide, okay, listen, I want to move into the Inside Lane now. Now, this is how everything evolved. This is amazing how everything evolved when I’m really talking about this. How did the Mindset Choice come about? This is even shorter program. It’s a shorter program. The mindset choice, the choice that changes everything came about, again, because I saw so many entrepreneurs, individuals who did not truly understand the power of mindset.

0:27:36.7 KA: I put something together that was a short program for them. It’s like there’s about two and a half hours of video in total. But I spread it out. I spread it out over like eight days. Day zero, just giving people instructions on what to do and how they can interact. ‘Cause I want people to engage and interact in the program as well, so they can actually interact with me as well, even though it’s a recorded program. And I give them instructions. And then they have. Day one is like a half hour video, day two and day three the same. And then I give four bonus days, like 15 minutes each.

0:28:11.4 KA: And for them to understand how powerful mindset is. And I did this program completely free. So anybody who would like to engage in that program, they can do it 100% free. And I did this on purpose, again, so that one can understand how powerful it truly is. Because I’ve seen so many people they hear about mindset. Let’s face it. The majority of people have heard about mindset in one way or another. Yet it gets pushed to the side. It gets pushed to the side. Something I call the triple U syndrome. The U being the letter U. They essentially, they underrate mindset. The underestimate mindset. And finally, because of that, they underutilize it.

0:29:00.9 KA: And again, letting people off the hook, it’s simply because that’s the way you have been taught. Because you’ve been taught to take this massive action all the time. And it’s all about taking action, taking action, taking action. I hate to disappoint those people out there. Actually, I’m quite excited to disappoint those people out there who are listening. But it’s not about action, action, action, action. Action has its importance, but there’s a significant difference between action and inspired action. And inspired action can save you a ton of time. And inspiration comes when you actually stay quiet. It’s simple.

0:29:42.7 WB: You have a formula, Ken, to this point, right? I came across your formula, the 1 x 365 equals 42.

0:29:54.6 KA: Brilliant. Yes. 1 x 365. Yeah, I put together, I actually put together, I had put together a talk for that. I once had to do a 10 minute talk on that. A 10 minute talk is actually much more challenging than an hour. Yeah, 1 x 365 equals 42. And this is really, when I sort of like looked at this, I said, this is really cool. So how do you get 1 x 365 equals 42? So we’re talking about being quiet and staying quiet. It’s one of the first things I actually have to work with with an entrepreneur is because a lot of entrepreneurs, they got great ideas and they’re going and they’re attempting to figure out how their business is going to thrive or survive. And the mind is just going. It’s going all the time. It’s going 24/7.

0:30:41.4 KA: So even if they’re attempting to take some sort of break, if you want to call it, they’re still thinking, they’re still going. So it is essential to quiet down. Why is it essential to quiet down? If we’re going to look scientifically, it’s really just slowing down your brainwaves. So most people are in beta brainwaves, which is for us to have a conversation that we’re mostly in beta brainwaves. We can slow those down to alpha and then we can take them into theta and deltas when we’re asleep.

0:31:10.2 KA: Yet why is that essential to slow it down? Because when we actually slow ourselves down, when you slow yourself down, you can allow yourself to receive. That’s when you can actually receive. It’s not about chasing inspiration or chasing ideas. It’s about receiving because all of those ideas and those solutions, they’re all out there. They’re in a frequency out there in the field. Call it whatever you’d like. So slowing yourself down is really important. So 1 x 365 equals 42.

0:31:43.0 KA: Well, if you were to actually take an hour a day for yourself, an hour a day for yourself, bit of quiet time. And again, that could be, it could be going to work out. It could be partially working out. Yet I’m talking about like quiet time where you take an hour where there’s no internet, there’s no phones, there’s no distractions. There’s, you’re just like on your own quiet. Potentially in nature is a great way to do that as well, depending where you are in the world. Sometimes from places, it’s very easy to get out into a forest very easily. Here, it’s very easy to get down near the water very easily. So in taking that time, you take one hour a day for 365 days. That’s 365 hours in a year.

0:32:31.4 KA: Now, the cool thing is 365 hours is the equivalent of 42 eight-hour working days. Now, for the most part, if I were to approach any entrepreneur, any business owner, and say, listen, I’d like you to take 42 days off, they’d probably be looking at me what are you, crazy? 42 days? You know what would happen in 42 days if I was not around for 42 days? Yet you can spread it out by simply taking an hour a day. And I think this is something that, I see this as well.

0:33:14.7 KA: So you have entrepreneurs who will say, okay, I have this one week or this two weeks off this year. And now this is gonna make up for the rest of the year. Well, this doesn’t really create balance. And for the most part, what happens during that week or during that two weeks, there’s still very much going on in their mind and focus and concern what’s going on in my business, what’s going on. So how is this actually going to save you time by doing this? Because when you do stay quiet, as I said, that is the time when boom, an idea comes to your head.

0:33:51.6 KA: Someone’s name pops into your head. Hey, this would be a really good person to contact.

0:33:57.5 WB: Yes.

0:34:00.4 KA: And they’re your next sale. They’re your next client. Simply because you allowed yourself to receive it rather than chasing, chasing, chasing. And this is why this is so significantly important.

0:34:15.4 WB: It’s a great approach, Ken. I try and practice it myself. I wouldn’t say I’m always successful. I have a challenge for you right now, though, because we’re getting too tight for time. And I’d love you to introduce the Arc method before we wrap up.

0:34:35.8 KA: Sure.

0:34:36.5 WB: Could you take a couple of minutes and just give an overview of what the Arc method is.

0:34:41.2 KA: Absolutely. And we’ve already covered a tiny bit already. So absolutely, very good. So the Arc method, and I chose the Arc method simply because an Arc is one of the strongest structures in architecture as a foundation. And the Arc method is what I believe a truly strong foundation when it comes to mindset. And that’s the reason I chose that name. It’s based on five pillars and these pillars underline every single program that I do. They will always underline every single program that I do. So whether it’s the Inside Lane, whether it’s the Cruising to Clarity, whether it’s the Mindset Choice, it underlies it all.

0:35:22.2 KA: And it starts, number one pillar is what we are doing right now here is creating awareness. Everything starts from awareness. That’s your learning. So when you are pushing mindset to the side, you’re actually stopping yourself from becoming more aware of how powerful it is. So awareness is number one. Everything begins from awareness. What you don’t know, you don’t know. And what you do know sometimes is not actually the truth. So it’s really important to continuously look at that awareness, continuously be learning. So that’s the number one pillar.

0:36:02.3 KA: The number two pillar is adapting. Adapting is about change. We’ve spoken a lot about change, it’s inevitable. Ironically, change is the only constant. It’s the constant. Change is going to happen. So learning to how to embrace that change, learning how to because of the awareness, you’re gonna have new epiphanies. And now you’re going to say, hey, you know what? I always did this this way. Now I have a different perception. Potentially I could change things. I can adapt. I can do things differently. So that’s the second pillar.

0:36:38.5 KA: The third pillar, which is right in the middle, and it’s connected to everything as well, is alignment. Alignment is about inspiration, what we were just talking about. And you can make that happen every single day simply by taking that time, quiet time. Simply a really easy thing for many people to do is first thing in the morning, show appreciation, whatever it is you can appreciate. What could you appreciate? So you can set the tone for the day. So you can align yourself, ground yourself so that you’re in a stronger position connected to call it whatever you’d like to call it. Call it the divine, call it source energy, call it the field.

0:37:20.1 KA: Personally, I’ve coined it the umami self. And I coined it the umami self because in the food world, umami is that, the definition of umami is the essence of deliciousness. When you eat something so beautiful, so delicious, you can’t even describe it. So the umami self is the essence of the deliciousness of who you truly are, of who you truly are. So that’s alignment. That’s the third pillar.

0:37:44.6 KA: Fourth pillar is applying. Which is not simply action, yet it is inspired action. And understanding more about inspired action and how that is actually gonna make you more efficient as we’ve already mentioned, which is gonna save you a ton of time. This time that so many entrepreneurs are in search of having more time for their relationships, time for their hobbies, the things that they love doing, right? And I want to mention something about alignment as well. It’s tapping into the fact that you can just have fun. Enjoy your journey. Because you’re never gonna have a joyful outcome by having a miserable journey. It’s never going to happen or it’s going to take a real long time. So applying inspired action.

0:38:37.2 KA: And then the final one, which has been huge in my life as well, and continues to be, is allowing. And allowing is associated very much with trust. Trust in yourself, trust in other people as well, trust in the divine, again, trust in your umami self, it’s really about that and trusting and coming to a point with true freedom. One of the key elements of true freedom is being able to accept what is going on, accepting everything. No longer worried about what other people are thinking and saying about you potentially or what you believe people are saying and thinking about everything.

0:39:26.7 KA: And understanding, having true freedom, you come to a point where you realize, irrelevant of the results that you’re obtaining right now or not, irrelevant of what’s going on in your life, your worthiness, who you truly are, is never compromised. It’s never compromised. Before you actually come to that realization, it’s very challenging to actually have that true freedom. ‘Cause many people are concerned about what are they thinking and do they think I’m a good enough entrepreneur or not? Are my business results enough to be considered, let’s say, recognized in my field or whatever it may be.

0:40:13.8 S3: Always concerned about what’s going on with other people and that you’re never really free ’cause you’re always thinking about what other people are. You think other people are thinking. So you’re not letting yourself have that freedom to just conduct your business the way you want to conduct it, how you’d like to conduct it, how you feel is aligned with your values. Sometimes people are compromising their values just to satisfy other people’s values. And that’s just not freedom.

0:40:41.7 KA: So those are the five pillars that underline every single program that I have in a nutshell.

0:40:47.3 WB: Is there anything you’re working on right at this moment? 

0:40:50.7 KA: What I’m working on right now, there’s two things, predominant things that I’m going to be working on this year for sure. There’s a couple of live events that I’d like to do this year, definitely here. That’s going to be here locally. Retreats are in the near future as well. It’s something else that is gonna be, I believe, dear to my heart as well. This is sort of like an exclusive. [laughter] Is I’m working on something that I’m actually calling the Quiet Time series. It’s gonna be a Quiet Time series, which are gonna be a couple of audios, probably about three audios at first, accompanied with these audios are gonna be sort of like a guided meditation affirmation. It’s a mixture.

0:41:35.4 KA: One of them is actually gonna be called my daily reminder. And it’s something that someone can listen to and there’s gonna be music with it as well so I really want to make it something that someone can just listen to on a daily basis and just remind themselves. So I’m gonna be working I’m putting together this quiet time series that I’d like to have available this year I’m not sure exactly when yet ’cause there’s another a couple of components that are being put together but I do have two of the… I can say right now that I have two of the three written. I’ve done like a test audio already. And now it’s just about applying some of the music to it and this type of stuff.

0:42:13.1 KA: So those are definitely, that’s something definitely that I’m working on this year as well. And I look forward to being able to offer as a separate product as well.

0:42:21.7 WB: Where can people find you if they want to connect with you or follow what you’re doing? 

0:42:25.3 KA: Yeah, absolutely. They can easily if they want to get a hold of me by email, they can absolutely do that at ken@mindsetmalta.com. If I could just interject here as well, if someone is interested in the Mindset Choice program, which is, like I said, completely free, they just have to go to growth4 the number four entrepreneurs.com. And there they can get some more information about the program, about myself as well. And they can actually register for the program there and then on that page as well.

0:43:00.1 WB: Final words of wisdom that you may like to share with our ET listener base? 

0:43:07.9 KA: Absolutely. I’ll finish with this. And I actually like to finish a lot of my videos with this and remind myself. And this is what I say to you. I say it first, enjoy your journey. It’s all about enjoying and having fun throughout that journey. And when you can find the joy in that journey, irrespective of the results that are coming. And that’s part of the freedom as well. And that’s really what I consider true success as well is when even when you’re swaying through the difficult moments, you can still be enjoying it. And that takes practice like anything else.

0:43:39.5 KA: And then ultimately, what I like to say is this, remember to laugh a lot, lot more, especially when you can laugh at yourself.

0:43:52.3 WB: Thank you so much for being on the ET Project. It’s been great and all the best for what you have planned for 2024.

0:44:01.1 KA: Thank you very much. It’s been an absolute pleasure, Wayne. Thanks a lot.

0:44:05.9 S2: Thank you for joining us on the ET Project, a show for executive talent development. Until next time, check out our site for free videos, e-books, webinars, and blogs at coaching4companies.com.