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ET-090: A conversation with Ms. Karen Brown

ET-090: A conversation with Ms. Karen Brown

and your host Wayne Brown on February 27, 2024

and your host Wayne Brown on February 27, 2024

Episode notes: A conversation with Ms. Karen Brown

Hello and welcome to the ET Project. I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and as usual, we’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET.

And today we are back in Colorado, in Denver no less, in the Rocky Mountains during winter. What a sight. And we are here to connect with our guest, Ms. Karen Brown, a focused athlete having competed as an amateur in the Ironman World Championship, as well as numerous ultra-marathon events worldwide.

On top of that, holding down a career that spans 30 years as a corporate executive. And since 2012 has been the founder of the company, Exponential Results. Karen draws on over 20,000 hours of senior executive coaching experience, and for all of you uninitiated, that’s one heck of a lot of coaching.

Years ago, Karen discovered the key to greater performance and effectiveness, identifying and addressing blind spots, the repeated thinking patterns that impede success.

Here is an extract from our conversation as we start to get into it…

I wanna learn and know everything I can, and was very open. And so anyone who would teach me, I would take their advice, whatever they had to teach I would take. So I just did it for 15 years, and during that time I was an up-and-coming corporate leader. I went from a great individual contributor, then got promoted into leadership, promoted to my highest level of incompetence you might say. And back then when you were promoted and then suddenly you found yourself leading a team, you were expected how to figure out how to bring out the best performance from that team. There was no leadership coaching back then. There was no how-to-be-a-leader manual. There was nothing like that. We didn’t even have podcasts…

Today’s Guest: MS KAREN BROWN

Using a professional coach and science-based methodologies on how our mind works, she busted through her own blind spots to achieve astounding results. Her discovery led to the creation of Exponential Results proprietary Power Pathways method based in neuroscience.

Karen is also the author of ‘Unlimiting Your Beliefs: 7 Keys to Greater Success in Your Personal and Professional Life’. The book is available on Amazon as well as other online outlets. She’s often called upon as a subject matter expert in leadership and is a frequent podcast guest and has given presentation and keynotes on leadership for organizations.

Among her many achievements in the support of her coaching practices, Karen has studied human behavior patterns, neuroscience and neuro-linguistic programming, or NLP.

Final words from Karen:

So that’s everything that the APP does, it has a metrics function, a goal-setting function, different functions like a whiteboard where the coach and the client can work together in the same system at the same time on a piece of work. Worksheets, which we might give to a client based on what we were talking about earlier with NLP if they need to anchor something or model or reframe, we can put something in a worksheet that is educational and just explains what it is and then how to do it. And then they can use that as a frame of reference that we can come back to over time and they can continue to use as they move forward. Also ongoing actions, so we can set up projects, say for a big goal that has actions involved with it. Sort of like if you think about a project management flow chart, kind of like that, and it’s just way of organizing the work best for the client. But I would say the coolest part about this is that it provides a structure that does make it straightforward for clients to do the work.

That’s what many clients have shared with us. That it’s not this kind of very loosey goosey show up to your coaching session and your coach is just going to say, “Well hey, Wayne, what do you want to work on today?” And then they’ll count on you to take notes and to build in continuity between sessions, no, that’s all built-in within the structure of our system and app. And then it is also a mobile app so that you have all of this in the palm of your hand, wherever you are, whatever time zone you’re in, whenever you’re traveling, ’cause that supports you fully every day of the month to do work and elevate your leadership effectiveness and performance rather than just the couple of times a month when we have sessions…

Transcript:

[music]

0:00:02.4 Wayne Brown: Hello, I’m your host Wayne Brown, and welcome to the ET Project. We’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world, and we’re affectionately referring to as team ET.

0:00:14.2 WB: And today we are back in Colorado, in Denver no less, in the Rocky Mountains during winter. What a sight. And we are here to connect with our guest, Ms. Karen Brown, a focused athlete having competed as an amateur in the Ironman World Championship, as well as numerous ultra-marathon events worldwide.

0:00:34.4 WB: On top of that, holding down a career that spans 30 years as a corporate executive. And since 2012 has been the founder of the company, Exponential Results. Karen draws on over 20,000 hours of senior executive coaching experience, and for all of you uninitiated, that’s one heck of a lot of coaching.

0:00:54.8 WB: Years ago, Karen discovered the key to greater performance and effectiveness, identifying and addressing blind spots, the repeated thinking patterns that impede success.

0:01:06.0 WB: Using a professional coach and science-based methodologies on how our mind works, she busted through her own blind spots to achieve astounding results. Her discovery led to the creation of Exponential Results proprietary Power Pathways method based in neuroscience.

0:01:24.7 WB: Karen is also the author of ‘Unlimiting Your Beliefs: 7 Keys to Greater Success in Your Personal and Professional Life’. The book is available on Amazon as well as other online outlets. She’s often called upon as a subject matter expert in leadership and is a frequent podcast guest and has given presentation and keynotes on leadership for organizations.

0:01:49.6 WB: Among her many achievements in the support of her coaching practices, Karen has studied human behavior patterns, neuroscience and neuro-linguistic programming, or NLP. So here we go team, are you ready for a state change? Get set to release those limiting beliefs and embrace your true potential. Let’s dive into the conversation with our guest, Ms. Karen Brown, as we discuss a wide array of topics from mindset to self-awareness to next-level team performance, all through the aid of the relationship intelligence quotient.

0:02:27.2 S?: Welcome to the ET project, a podcast for those executive talents determined to release their true potential and create an impact. Join our veteran coach and mentor Wayne Brown as we unpack an exciting future together.

0:02:44.1 WB: Alright, well, welcome again Team ET as you’ve heard me introduce, today we’re speaking with my namesake, Ms. Karen Brown. Today team we’re going to be plunging deep, looking for leadership blind spots. Now, when I first heard about this from Karen, I was thinking, “Yeah, well, okay, we’re gonna be talking about the good old Johari’s window exercise.”

0:03:07.2 WB: However, I’ve since discovered to my joy, I have to say, that we’re gonna be delving into the minds, looking at neuroscience, going into the subconscious as well as the automated unconscious, I have to say. So I’m pretty excited. We’re going to also be tapping into neuro-linguistic programming, NLP, you probably know it better by, and discussing how to break unhelpful, limiting, thinking patterns that ultimately shape our behavior. So we’ll be exploring as well something called RQ, which you probably haven’t heard of. Karen will be able to share all of this.

0:03:47.8 WB: And this has an impact around teams, and I hope if we ask really nicely, we might even coax Karen into sharing about how she leverages NLP for state changes herself in her training and the races that she participates in. So with all of that said, Karen Brown, welcome to the ET Project. Great joy to have you here with us.

0:04:11.6 Karen Brown: Thank you, Wayne. Really excited to be here.

0:04:15.5 WB: What I’d like to do is hit you with a few rapid fire questions just to build a bit of a profile around who you are and your identity and some of your core beliefs etcetera. So I like to understand people’s identity, who they are, rather than read their bio and get their history. We’ll talk about that more so later. But, so the first question would be, who is Karen Brown? 

0:04:41.2 KB: Well, Karen Brown is an accomplished ultra athlete, having competed on the world stage at one point for six years, and an author. I’ve been a speaker. The one thing that I am gifted at, and I repeat that, the one thing I am gifted at is behavior and reading people’s behavior and therefore executive leadership coaching.

0:05:11.2 KB: And I’m also a very humble yet driven person like you might imagine. And gosh, a year ago I just took up the electric guitar out of the blue. I’ve never played a musical instrument before and got a spark of an idea and I went with it. And I am having a blast. I love doing new things. I am a pilgrim of self-discovery and continuous growth.

0:05:40.5 WB: Your number-one core value, what do you believe that to be? 

0:05:44.5 KB: My number-one core value would be growth.

0:05:49.2 WB: Do you know your greatest limiting belief? 

0:05:53.4 KB: Now you’re right up my alley. My second published work is on limiting beliefs. I truly know I can do anything that I dream up, honestly.

0:06:08.4 WB: Nice.

0:06:10.5 KB: Well I’ll never be Eddie Van Halen [laughter] or Jimi Hendrix. I’m trying, I’m really trying, and I’ve heard their songs, but as my guitar instructor keeps telling me, “Wow, you got a long way to go kid.” [laughter]

0:06:28.9 WB: I’m dubious about you saying you never, because I think your track record doesn’t support that, anyway, higher purpose, do you have anything you’re striving for longer term? 

0:06:41.5 KB: Yes, absolutely. Number one; eradicate limiting beliefs and humans struggle with them. They’re literally a bug that’s left over in our operating system, and they really don’t serve the original intended purpose anymore. They really just hold us back from our potential. So, that’s why I wrote the book. And so, I’d love to see that happen in my lifetime. Second is; our purpose, which is to elevate leadership performance and effectiveness, and to help leaders realize their potential. I really do feel like that is my purpose on the earth, my special purpose. So, there you have it.

0:07:30.5 WB: Very nice. Last question in this little set, if you were shipwrecked on a desert island, stretch the imagination, that’s shipwrecked, and you could choose two other people to be there with you, who would they be? 

0:07:49.6 KB: Well, first it would be my fiancé of course.

0:07:51.2 WB: Of course. Of course.

0:07:52.7 KB: And you know what? If he wasn’t my fiancé, I would still choose him first, honestly. He is an extraordinary human being. The other person I would choose is my sister. I would say the same about her. If we weren’t sisters, I would still choose her as a chosen family member. And I think she is one of the most remarkable people walking the earth.

0:08:24.1 WB: To get a little bit of a deeper insight, let’s say, what I’d like to do first before we get into this broader topic, career history-wise, I know it’s quite extensive. So perhaps, if you don’t mind, if you can just share a little bit of the highlights of the career.

0:08:41.5 KB: Is that your way of saying I’m older? 

[laughter]

0:08:44.1 WB: No. And you can see I stumbled at the end because I don’t know, [laughter], did that come out that way? [laughter]

0:08:52.7 KB: I don’t mind at all. I have a birthday. I’m about to turn 56. I’m proud of it, and I feel better than ever. And I know that age is just a number. That’s all it is. So yes, the short version of my career began in commercial real estate. Back then, that was still a boy’s club, I think I’m okay in saying that. And I was so excited to be a part of that world that I didn’t even know enough to be scared. I literally just jumped in with both feet and soaked up all the knowledge I could like a sponge. I was in it for 15 years. I was successful in it. I loved it. I was a great match for it. And I think it was because I just came from a place of continuous learning.

0:09:45.8 KB: I wanna learn and know everything I can, and was very open. And so anyone who would teach me, I would take their advice, whatever they had to teach I would take. So I just did it for 15 years, and during that time I was an up-and-coming corporate leader. I went from a great individual contributor, then got promoted into leadership, promoted to my highest level of incompetence you might say. And back then when you were promoted and then suddenly you found yourself leading a team, you were expected how to figure out how to bring out the best performance from that team. There was no leadership coaching back then. There was no how-to-be-a-leader manual. There was nothing like that. We didn’t even have podcasts.

0:10:36.5 KB: It was way back in the stone age. And so, I really didn’t know what to do. And I did what came naturally to me, which is asking people questions about why they do what they do and why they don’t do certain things. And so, I would ask team members things like, “What motivates you to get outta bed every morning and come in and work here? What stops you? What demotivates you?” And when I found that it really worked well, I sort of stood back and scratched my head and went, “Okay, well, what am I doing exactly and why is it working?” [laughter] I was really thrilled it was working, but I didn’t know why and I didn’t know what it was I was doing. Quickly found out that I was coaching people, then I was… I was literally finding out what they needed, giving it to them, and then getting out of their way or empowering and supporting them.

0:11:36.3 KB: And it worked so beautifully. And I thought, “Wow, I really love this.” So, you could say, I backed into coaching ’cause I really did, and then I became an internal coach at the companies where I worked, still in commercial real estate. Then I got into formal coaching with a $270 billion global company that’s in real estate, has two initials, one of which begins with, or starts my first name. So you might be able to put together who that is. Anyway, went to work for them as a master coach, and that’s when I… It was then and in the years preceding that, that’s when I worked toward and received all of my mastery level credentials, behavioral pattern, neuro-linguistic programming, executive leadership coaching, etcetera, etcetera.

0:12:33.7 WB: When I was looking at your company, you had a previous company name, if I’m correct, it was Velocity Leadership versus what it is today, Exponential Results. What was the cause for the shift or the transition? 

0:12:49.6 KB: Ooh, actually, there was a name prior to Velocity Leadership Consulting, and that was Divine Potential. So what happened was, in my journey to the Ironman World Championships, and the year that I crossed the finish line there, which was 2012, I had a huge epiphany where everything I had been working on, and my experience up to that point, all coalesced into this almost explosion, in this epiphany that I wanted to start my own company to bring neuroscience concepts into leadership development and coaching, that hadn’t been done before. Now think back, Brené Brown wasn’t on the scene. Simon Sinek wasn’t around yet. Adam Grant, he had published books, but not on this subject yet. So really wasn’t anybody like us in the space yet. And so I all of a sudden put it together that, “Oh, wait a minute, this is the game changer. This is the exponential multiplier that leaders have been seeking for decades,” that it really does enable us to elevate quickly and permanently, then I founded the company on that precept in 2012. And then began trying to get some traction with it.

0:14:26.3 WB: Maybe just give a brief introduction to what it is you’re doing now with the company and how that’s helping people.

0:14:33.2 KB: Yeah. So we are a full service leadership development firm. Primarily we work in… Working with teams, of course executives, and by executives, I mean director level up through C-suite. So that’s where we really focus. And we work with teams and executives in one-on-one or team coaching. We are also starting to work with successors because we’ve seen over the last couple of years that there’s a real gap in the market for that work. There’s a lot of newer leaders that are ascending and stepping in to take the reins of a outward transitioning leader and it’s not going well. They’re not ready or they take over and they fail. And so there’s a big gap there. Also for new leaders, rising leaders, it’s very different now, because there are five generations in the workforce all at once, and it is quite something to figure out how to tap into every generation’s motivation, and how to bring out their best. So I also see that that was an important thing for us to start offering in our professional programs.

0:15:57.8 WB: Yeah. Our viewers can clearly see hanging on the wall behind you a picture of the Ironman. We can’t move forward until you share a little bit about that six-year period that you spoke about earlier.

0:16:13.9 KB: So, Ironman World Championships was a lifelong dream for me. I first saw it on TV on Wide World of Sports when I was 14, 1982. Julie Moss, up till then I had never heard of the Ironman, had no clue what it was, didn’t know about triathlons, nothing. Now I was athletic my whole life, but in recreational sports, both individual and team sports, but I’d never heard of triathlon or the Ironman. So when I saw this, I was mesmerized, couldn’t tear myself away from it. And I also started crying watching it, and I realized the reason I was having such a emotional uprising within me about it was because I sat there looking at it, thinking, “What if I have inside of me what it takes to do that and I’m not tapping into it?” I’m living this small safe life. I decided, or I guess I roughly decided that it was something I wanted to do eventually. However, for the next 28 years I held myself back from pursuing it through limiting beliefs. And once I became educated about what those were and how they worked, and then found out how to transform them, that very fall I started training for Ironman. I hired a coach, I bought a bike, and I started training.

0:17:55.8 WB: Wow.

0:17:56.2 KB: And over the next two years, which is a very short period of time for someone to decide that they’re going to pursue the Ironman World Championships, and to get there, that’s a very short period of time. I have friends in the community that have been trying for 10-plus years to get there and still have not. So, I used all of the neuroscience that I had been studying and practicing up to that point. I used myself as the Guinea pig. I had to transform all of my limiting beliefs into the unlimiting version of them. And two years later, I crossed the finish line in Hawaii. And footnote, I got to race with Julie Moss.

0:18:48.0 WB: Excellent. The Ironman, I think, you talk about it, you have to complete it within 17 hours. So you’re out there for a long time, it’s an individual sport. You may have a team at the different stations, but you’re there by yourself. So how do you maintain the focus? How do you overcome the challenges that invariably you face during that period? How do you get through it yourself? 

0:19:17.4 KB: Well, as I said in our previous conversation, you think about everything and nothing. And what I mean by that is for me, at least, and other athletes have shared the same thing with me, I think during that long period of time about everything that led me to that day, all of the training, all of the turns of fate that are plentiful in getting to something like that. All of the people I’ve come in contact with, all of the relationships I’ve formed, which have ended up being global connections and relationships. The magic of all of those, the wonder of it and how… I guess all of my discoveries during that timeframe, during that process most of which is usually something along the lines of I used to think it was 90% physical and 10% mental and it really is the opposite. And so usually during that time when I’m thinking of everything, I’m also marveling at how powerful our brains really are. And that once we understand how they work and our operating system, if you will, it’s very easy to leverage that power, the power and the speed of it.

0:21:00.4 KB: Yeah. And I’m also trying to be in a flow state which is thinking of nothing just enjoying being in that runner’s high, if you will, which is exactly what it feels like only times 1000. When I first started pursuing the Ironman, I had never completed a marathon. And so I didn’t… I had never found that runner’s high and I was so intrigued, I wanted to find it, “What does that feel like?” And so as my training grew longer and longer, I finally got into flow states and, oh, it was truly magnificent. I see why so many of my brethren, if you will, are addicted to ultra sports because once you experience a flow state, it feels like nothing else. Dash maybe like an orgasm, if you will, but elongated, lasting, you feel like you are connected to everything and that everything is almost effortless.

0:22:17.8 KB: And it’s almost as if you’re floating and you’re sort of watching yourself do this thing and magical and wonderful. If I could figure out how to bottle that and sell it, I would.

0:22:36.4 WB: You didn’t stop with the triathlons, however, you went to the ultra marathons. We were just talking before we hit record and your longest run, if I remember, was 320 miles and you’ve done this race twice, where does the logic come into this? At what point do you say, “Okay what’s driving me here?”

0:23:00.2 KB: There is no logic involved in that, zero. It’s actually when your brain goes fully off the rails, then you become an ultra endurance athlete. And just that point of clarity, it is called the Ultraman and it is a three-day, 320 mile triathlon.

0:23:21.1 WB: Maybe if you don’t mind, we’ll jump into the NLP and the coaching and how you’re approaching it.

0:23:27.4 KB: Yeah, absolutely. So NLP stands for neuro-linguistic programming. And if you think about it this way neuro-linguistics are the language of the brain and behavioral patterns is the operating system. So behavioral patterns is just how our brains work, how they operate, and neuro-linguistics is the language of the brain. And I should add that neuro-linguistics and the language that we use, the words that we use on a daily basis comes straight from our subconscious. We have a really hard time filtering them unless we’re lying, we’re crafting something on purpose. And even then you can totally tell when someone is doing it.

0:24:19.8 KB: So what I realized was that when you work in these two systems then you are essentially working in the subconscious mind, which is almost infinitely more powerful and faster than working in your conscious mind. So for instance your conscious mind processes volume and speed are around 2,000 bits of information per second and 100 to 150 miles per hour. So, decently fast car can go that speed. Compared though to your subconscious mind, processing speed and volume. Volume is 2 billion bits of information per second and the processing speed is just shy of the speed of light. So it makes sense then that if you work at that level in neuro-linguistics and behavioral patterns, then change is much easier because your subconscious mind is the system that creates behavioral patterns, they’re not created at the conscious level.

0:25:41.5 KB: And that then your speed of change and the permanence of change is going to be much more rapid and then lasting.

0:25:49.5 WB: For anyone that’s a coach and you know about coaching models, I grew up with Professor Peter Hawkins and his CLEAR model, so it’s somewhat different, but maybe you could explain your Power Pathway method if you don’t mind? 

0:26:09.0 KB: Yeah. So it’s five steps and I’ll just say this to preface it. It takes a lot less time to actually go through all the five steps conversationally with a client than it will for you to explain them. So, first of all, we’re going to identify the leader’s goals and objectives. What are we going for? What are we working on? Then we’ll establish a plan, metrics of measurement, and target goal dates. How will we see progress? How will we know when we’ve achieved the goal? Then we will uncover the thinking patterns that are causing the challenges.

0:26:50.2 KB: We’ll pinpoint the behavioral pattern that’s at play. We’ll identify the root cause, look at the impact of that behavioral pattern, keeping it the same or changing it, and then choose a new pattern to run instead, that’s going to achieve the goal or create the new outcome that you’re going for, then we’ll evaluate and measure progress and accomplishments and determine the next level.

0:27:21.2 WB: We also spoke before about the difference between one-on-one coaching and team coaching, and this is where we come to this RQ area. I hadn’t heard about this until I spoke with you the first time, so I’ve had the joy of doing a little bit of research on it. So, I’m a little bit more intelligent now about it, but it’s about relationship intelligence. So, would you like to share your understanding because it will be much better than mine? So, would you like to share a little bit about what RQ is really all about? 

0:27:54.7 KB: Yes. So RQ stands for Relationship Intelligence Quotient, just like EQ. And if you think about it in this way, it is the next evolution of emotional intelligence, okay? And it’s all about… And it’s scientifically rooted as well, it’s all about the science of how we get things done through relationships. So, how we achieve results through our relationships at work. And the truly remarkable and fascinating thing about this is, it enables us to map out every executive leader’s motivational value system, how they operate, how they try to get things done and their conflict sequences, which is wonderful to see, especially with an executive team, because every time we’ve done this, we put the data up on the wall or up on the screen. And once everybody understands what they’re looking at, they literally sit back in their chair and go, “Holy smokes! How in the world did you know that this is the dynamic that plays out with our team? How did you know that?” Yeah and it’s uncanny, 100% accurate. And it’s just scientific.

0:29:27.9 KB: It’s not a psychometric test, it’s not a personality test that says, “Oh, well, your personality is wrong in some way for what we’re measuring or for the outcomes you want.” No, it just inventories current behavior, that’s it. And that alleviates a stumbling block for a lot of leaders to get into that self-awareness because they get there through curiosity, like, “Oh, look what this says.” And it’s not strengths and weaknesses, it’s only strengths. So it’s the premise that none of this is good, bad, or has anything to do with capability or inability, it just is. And so case in point, I’m working with a leadership team right now, and let’s just say that several members of the team got sideways with each other. And this has gone on for a couple of years, it’s gotten pretty distasteful. Anyway their eyes are now being opened to how they operate, first of all, understanding that and then being able to see how their counterpart operates and all these light bulbs are going off and they go, “This makes so much sense now, this explains why they do what they do, how we’ve locked horns on some things and how in other areas we work really well together.”

0:31:00.0 WB: There’s three areas, if I understand correctly, that you look at performance, people, process, and the way that it’s revealed is like an inverted triangle with each and each corner type of thing. And you are then plotting their strengths, as you said, or their oriented strengths, and you can clearly see the differences between the people. So I guess that’s how it’s presented, is that how it works or? 

0:31:35.5 KB: Yes. Yeah, so this is all… Stems back to the work of Dr. Elias Porter, remember I said it was scientific, and he started working on this couple of decades ago, actually four decades ago, and yes so we’re able to plot out graphically our individual motivational value systems and conflict sequences, so. And it comes out on a triangle and each point of the triangle is a different area or motivator for us. And so one triangle is performance, one is people and one is process. So all this means, wherever your dot lands on the graph, is how you primarily try to get things done. Do you have more of performance in mind and results? And these folks, which is me, tend to be very fast-paced, high sense of urgency on everything, everything is a priority, they make decisions rapidly, they probably talk rapidly and they’re just like, “Get out of my way so that I can get this done.”

0:32:48.9 KB: Then people people or people-motivated people, just like the name implies, they tend to be more driven and try to get things done through people and always thinking about, “What is the impact of this to people that are involved? How is this going to benefit people?” And then process, just like the name sounds, they’re all about the process, data, analytics. “How are we going to do this? What is the process of it? What is the process that’s going to get us there?” And they sometimes are called questioners as well, because if you are in a meeting with these lovely folks, they’re all about the details and they can’t ask enough questions. “Well, what is this going to look like? Well, why are we doing it this way? Well, have we considered these other ways of doing it?” on and on. These are also… This can play out in your personal life too, these are the researchers among us, they want to look at every single website, every single option, compare them all on a spreadsheet and then make their decision, and this doesn’t mean that any one style, if you will, is better than another or what is worse than another, no it just is, it’s just the way that we operate, it’s the way that we learned to operate to try to get things done.

0:34:25.7 WB: One final area that I’d like to touch on before we start to wrap up, and that’s the coaching app, A-P-P, that you have within your organization. So maybe you could just explain how that works within this whole landscape of what you do.

0:34:43.8 KB: So our coaching app, A-P-P, thank you for that, is called Power Pathways Portal, and you can get a glimpse of it on the website under Power Pathways and then Portal. What we did was when I founded the company 11 years ago I, of course, came from a leadership background and realized that we needed a system for clients to work in along with their coach, and that also had all these functions to work in behavioral patterns and achieve goals and make all of that straightforward, if you will. You’ll notice I shy away from the word easy only because I don’t want it to be a misnomer, making behavioral changes is actually easy when you choose to do it, when you have a high level of willingness to do it, then it comes pretty easily once you dig in and do the work. However I don’t tend to use that word. I use straightforward more often because I think that’s easier for us to understand and to interpret for each of us.

0:36:07.6 KB: So that’s everything that the APP does, it has a metrics function, a goal-setting function, different functions like a whiteboard where the coach and the client can work together in the same system at the same time on a piece of work. Worksheets, which we might give to a client based on what we were talking about earlier with NLP if they need to anchor something or model or reframe, we can put something in a worksheet that is educational and just explains what it is and then how to do it. And then they can use that as a frame of reference that we can come back to over time and they can continue to use as they move forward. Also ongoing actions, so we can set up projects, say for a big goal that has actions involved with it. Sort of like if you think about a project management flow chart, kind of like that, and it’s just way of organizing the work best for the client. But I would say the coolest part about this is that it provides a structure that does make it straightforward for clients to do the work.

0:37:25.4 KB: That’s what many clients have shared with us. That it’s not this kind of very loosey goosey show up to your coaching session and your coach is just going to say, “Well hey, Wayne, what do you want to work on today?” And then they’ll count on you to take notes and to build in continuity between sessions, no, that’s all built-in within the structure of our system and app. And then it is also a mobile app so that you have all of this in the palm of your hand, wherever you are, whatever time zone you’re in, whenever you’re traveling, ’cause that supports you fully every day of the month to do work and elevate your leadership effectiveness and performance rather than just the couple of times a month when we have sessions.

0:38:16.9 WB: And certainly I can see the value that clients would be able to get from using it for sure. So Karen, obviously a lot going on in your world, anything that you’re working towards for the future? Apart from getting married, I guess. So anything within the company, within the career that you’re looking towards? 

0:38:38.2 KB: Since inception of the company, my goal has been for us to be the company of choice for brain-based leadership development and coaching, and so that is still on the horizon and what I work toward every day.

0:38:53.9 WB: You have a book ‘Unlimiting Beliefs’, if I recall correctly where can we access that? 

0:39:00.3 KB: ‘Unlimiting Your Beliefs’ by Karen Brown, you can find on good old Amazon.

0:39:06.8 WB: Okay. Very good. Thank you. And final words of wisdom for our listeners. If they find themselves stuck or find themselves needing help, what is your suggestion as a starting point for them? 

0:39:21.5 KB: Well, if you find yourself stuck and needing help, call us.

[laughter]

0:39:28.2 WB: Of course, of course.

0:39:30.2 KB: Yeah. And remember that you are in the driver’s seat of your brain. You really are. It’s just, again, that self-discovery and that self-awareness of how that works and how you are able to leverage your operating system. And that we all are truly capable of anything we can think of.

0:39:58.5 WB: Karen Brown it’s been, as expected, a great conversation, great pleasure, to have you on the ET Project.

0:40:05.1 KB: Thank you Wayne, it has been delightful.

0:40:09.1 S?: Thank you for joining us on the ET Project, a show for executive talent development, until next time. Check out our site for free videos, eBooks, webinars, and blogs at coaching4companies.com.