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ET Project \ Podcasts

ET-064: The secret in transitioning from adversity and fear of failure to becoming a high-performance leader

With Ms. LynAnn Weaver

ET-064: A conversation with Ms. LynAnn Weaver

and your host Wayne Brown on September 12, 2023

Episode notes: A conversation with Ms. LynAnn Weaver

Hello and welcome to the ET Project. I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and as usual, we’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET.

Today we are back to one of their favorite places on this great earth, Colorado’s Capital City, Denver. The majestic Rocky Mountains. We are fortunate to be catching up with leading keynote speaker and certified high-performance coach, Ms. LynAnn Weaver, to discuss among many topics the need for all leaders to first develop a strong self-awareness.

LynAnn is a leadership powerhouse with over 15 years of experience in business, focusing on leadership development and training. She empowers organizations, schools, and individuals to reach their full potential. Throughout her healthcare career, LynAnn has a proven track record of success in driving business results and improving employee performance.

Here is an extract from our conversation as we start to get into it…

“…And so I really started diving into the world of high performance. And some of that came from just times in my own life when I had really struggled to overcome adversity and been faced with some pretty challenging things. And I kind of tapped back in as I was observing these differences between those two groups of, what I now call high performers and people with high potential, was some of the things that I had implemented when I was facing a really challenging time in my life and had actually overcome that. And so that the time was, I was 16 and ended up getting ejected from a car and having the car roll on top of me and waking up to the words, “I’m sorry LynAnn, but you were crushed by a car, you’re never going to walk again because your injuries are too severe….”

Today’s Guest: MS. LYNANN WEAVER

LynAnn is a master at devising and executing business development plans, demonstrated by her success as a neuroscience service line director, where she increased year-over-year case volume by 20% and revenue by 34% in an extremely competitive market.

LynAnn’s ability to inspire and engage groups of all sizes and backgrounds is unrivaled. As a skilled facilitator and Speaker.

LynAnn creates a positive and productive learning environment that creates and leads to measurable improvements in employee engagement, productivity, and overall performance. Her ability to understand the unique needs of her clients has led to the development of customized training programs that are tailored to the specific goals and objectives of each organization.

LynAnn’s passion for leadership development and training is matched only by her commitment to delivering results. She’s dedicated to helping organizations and individuals achieve their full potential through dynamic leadership training, coaching, and speaking. And she’s always eager to take on new challenges.

She’s a leader in her field and known for her ability to create a culture of continuous learning, growth, and development. During our conversation, you’ll hear us speaking about the need for good habit formation, plus a positive mindset and behavior. LynAnn’s own backstory demonstrates how this can be translated into action alongside her mantra, “just one more.”

Final words from LynAnn:

“Really take a look at how you can improve your self-awareness, because self-awareness drives your thoughts, and your thoughts start to drive your actions.

And when we learn how to become more self-aware, to ask ourselves those questions, that can really change our direction or the way that we’re thinking. It allows us to drive and change our actions, which changes our outcomes. And so as many people like to think that an organization can’t be changed by one person, it really can, and it doesn’t even have to be the leader at the very top.

The more aware that we become, the more aware of others and the way that we think, the way that we react, the way that we respond or get to choose how to respond to situations, can change the way that we experience our workplace, the way that others experience their workplace or their life.

And it starts to create this incredible ripple effect, that can touch the lives of so many more people than who you’ll ever even know. But the first step in becoming a great leader is really becoming a leader of self first. So what actions do you need to take, to become a better version of yourself so that you can lead at a higher level?…

[music]

0:00:03.5 Wayne Brown: Hello, I’m your host, Wayne Brown and welcome to The ET project. We’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world, whom we’re affectionately referring to as team ET. Today we are back to one of their favorite places on this great earth, Colorado’s Capital City, Denver. The majestic Rocky Mountains. We are fortunate to be catching up with leading keynote speaker and certified high performance coach, Ms. LynAnn Weaver, to discuss among many topics the need for all leaders to first develop a strong self-awareness. LynAnn is a leadership powerhouse with over 15 years of experience in business, focusing on leadership development and training. She empowers organizations, schools, and individuals to reach their full potential. Throughout her healthcare career, LynAnn has a proven track record of success in driving business results and improving employee performance.

0:01:01.2 WB: She’s a master at devising and executing business development plans, demonstrated by her success as a neuroscience service line director, where she increased year over year case volume by 20% and revenue by 34% in an extremely competitive market. LynAnn’s ability to inspire and engage groups of all sizes and backgrounds is unrivaled. As a skilled facilitator and Speaker LynAnn creates a positive and productive learning environment that creates and leads to measurable improvements in employee engagement, productivity and overall performance. Her ability to understand the unique needs of her clients has led to the development of customized training programs that are tailored to specific goals and objectives of each organization. LynAnn’s passion for leadership development and training is matched only by her commitment to delivering results. She’s dedicated to helping organizations and individuals achieve their full potential through dynamic leadership training, coaching, and speaking. And she’s always eager to take on new challenges.

0:02:10.3 WB: She’s a leader in her field known for her ability to create a culture of continuous learning, growth and development. During our conversation, you’ll hear us speaking about the need for good habit formation, plus a positive mindset and behavior. LynAnn’s own backstory demonstrates how this can be translated into action alongside with her mantra, just one more. So team ET, if you’re ready to be inspired and as always, a little challenge to gaze inwardly at your own leadership, then sit back and ready yourself for this very important chat with our guest, Ms. LynAnn Weaver in this episode titled “The Secret to Transitioning from Adversity and a Fear of Failure to Becoming a High Performance Leader.”

0:02:58.7 Speaker 3: Welcome to the ET project, a podcast for those executive talents determined to release their true potential and create an impact. Join our veteran coach and mentor Wayne Brown as we unpack an exciting future together.

0:03:15.5 WB: Alright, well good morning team ET. You won’t know this, but this is our second time around for this podcast recording, so we’re having some fun at the moment. Welcome to this week. I’m hopeful that everyone is doing well and that you are really starting to achieve those goals. Many of you I know are coming up to end of financial year, so I’m sure you’re under the gun trying to close the year on high and achieve your targets. So well done if you are. And good luck if you’re struggling to get there. Today we’ve got a really interesting guest and I’m not gonna spoil her story, LynAnn Weaver, welcome to The ET project. It’s great to have you on, all the way from Denver, Colorado.

0:03:57.5 LynAnn Weaver: Yeah, thank you so much for having me on. I’m excited to be here.

0:04:01.4 WB: We’re gonna jump into a whole range of topics, but I like to ask our guest LynAnn, is there anything at the moment that’s got you excited, whether it’s in your personal life, professional or anything in the world?

0:04:15.7 LW: Yeah, I think right now we are just on the verge of new opportunities and the ability for people to really tap into their creativity. Especially as AI comes out, which is really based off of historical data, now is the time for us to really step into just how amazing we are as humans and what our potential is to be able to create future focused and really be able to utilize strategies and problem solving to create, just creative solutions for some of the changes that are going on right now, especially with some of the hardships that businesses are going through. But then also just the changes and struggles that a lot of people are going through personally as well as professionally.

0:05:01.5 WB: I’m with you in terms of the AI, I think we’re pioneering a totally new era within human society and it’s exciting. Also, a little bit nervous, I would say is my feeling. Let’s hope that humanity really minds the degree of control that it needs to with the AI, and leverage the benefits that it can bring. So I’m with you with that. You have a really fascinating backstory and so I wonder if you would mind sharing it before we dive into some of the topics around high performance leadership, which we’ll be talking about mostly today. But I wonder if you would mind sharing a little on your backstory.

0:05:45.0 LW: Sure. So I was in healthcare administration for several years as the regional director of neurosciences. And during that time, and really what kind of got me into the high performance world and coaching world as well as speaking was starting to really see the struggles that my team was having and I was over several physicians and I really noticed a difference between the physicians who were excelling and doing really well, or the leaders who were excelling and doing really well, who were highly respected, highly motivated, seemed to get a lot of things done, and those who maybe struggled a little bit or weren’t as well respected or weren’t hitting the numbers that they were meant to hit, or growing their practices as quickly as we wanted them to. And then also the ones that ended up having some behavioral challenges or interpersonal conflicts that would really pull myself or our other leaders outside of our necessary daily tasks.

0:06:44.1 LW: And so I really started diving into the world of high performance. And some of that came from just times in my own life when I had really struggled to overcome adversity and been faced with some pretty challenging things. And I kind of tapped back in as I was observing these differences between those two groups of, what I now call high performers and people with high potential, was some of the things that I had implemented when I was facing a really challenging time in my life and had actually overcome that. And so that the time was, I was 16 and ended up getting ejected from a car and having the car roll on top of me and waking up to the words, “I’m sorry LynAnn, but you were crushed by a car, you’re never going to walk again because your injuries are too severe.” And at that point, it was just like all of these limitations just got spoken over me. What that meant to me was, well, because you can’t walk now, you can’t have the career that you wanted, because that required me to be standing and moving and using all of my limbs pretty consistently.

0:07:51.4 LW: And it also meant, all of those other things that go through the mind of a 16-year-old, “Will, I ever be loved again? What now, am I good enough? Well, I’ll never play sports. I’ll never do any of the things that I saw that created value in me based off of what my peers said value meant, or society meant, value meant.” And that process of just really learning to overcome those struggles, rising above those limits, that my physician who is very well-meaning, and statistically speaking based on modern science at the time, I shouldn’t have walked again. However, I chose not to accept that. And instead I chose to focus on what is just one more thing that I can do to be able to get one step closer. Even if I can’t, even if that’s not possible, I’m not going to give up until I’ve exhausted every single option. And there’s always one more thing that I can do. And after trial and trial and trial, I started taking really small steps just, and I could wiggle my toes first. And so that was all I did.

0:08:55.9 LW: And so I would see how much longer I could wiggle my toes, and then it was bending my ankles and then lifting my legs and then sitting for just a few moments longer then working up my way up to standing and then walking on a walker and crutches, and finally taking my first raw steps and running my first five K within three years after that accident. And a lot of the lessons that I learned through that process also applied to business and really kind of highlight the underpinnings of high performance. And there have been other times, especially during my leadership journey, where I didn’t tap back into those things. And so I started to feel like I was failing or I was struggling, or I was constantly stressed and fatigued. And as I kind of took that step back to say, “Okay, what’s different between these two groups?” Oh wait, I’m noticing all of these characteristics, really these habits in this group, and I’ve done that before, and that got me to be able to defy the odds in this one area. Why can’t I apply that also in my business life and help others be able to do the same.

0:10:09.1 WB: At the age of 16? I mean, that’s quite a remarkable mindset to have and a degree of courage. Where did that come from in your life? Was it through influence from your parents, from other influences?

0:10:25.6 LW: It was from a lot of different influences, and that’s one of the things that I’ve also found to be so powerful, is really making sure that we’re surrounding ourselves with that community of supportive voices. And said, my physician was well-meaning his intentions were to help me make sure that I was not setting my sights too high or doing something that was just gonna lead to disappointment or more pain. But the other people around me, like my mom who reminded me and asked me a few times, she’s like, “Are you gonna be limited by this? Are you limitless? God says you’re limitless, so what are you gonna focus on?” And then my cousin who was just a few years older than me actually had developed Guillain-Barré syndrome, which is the number one cause of non-traumatic acute paralysis and where the myelin sheath starts to degenerate and you don’t have electric impulses to stimulate your nerves. So you’re not able to move.

0:11:26.9 LW: And he actually fell over paralyzed and it took him two years to be able to do exactly what they had just told me that I would never do, which is he would never walk again either. And he had come into my hospital room, walked into my hospital room and handed me a three page handwritten note that basically said, “You can accomplish anything that you set your mind to.”

0:11:50.7 WB: When I look at what you’ve studied over your career, you’ve covered quite a variety of topics, but I would say with a some sort of central theme around neuroscience psychology, was that intentional, like did you set out with that intent?

0:12:11.1 LW: No, I kind of fell into it. It’s funny, I was a biology major in college and in our anatomy lab, the section that I hated the most was when we were doing anything neuro-related and brain dissection and going through all of that. So it’s kind of funny that I ended up falling into this career, but I just, I became fascinated with it. And I’m not a neuroscientist, I’m not a psychologist. I’m nothing that ends with an -ist. I’m just I have a business degree, I’ve got a biology degree and have studied quite a bit around those areas because they’re fascinating.

0:12:48.4 WB: Yeah. They’re really fascinating. And if I look at your studies in coaching as well, you’ve participated in the Core 100 life coaching with the Robbins-Madanes.

0:12:58.7 LW: Yeah. With Tony Robbins.

0:13:00.8 WB: Yeah. He and Brendan Burchard, they share some commonalities. I follow them myself, so I know them very well. But how much have you taken out of their learnings, their lessons as part of what you now do?

0:13:19.1 LW: It’s funny because all of the trainings that I’ve done, which it’s far beyond just those two, it’s kind of a meld of everything. But I really like Brendan’s work because the High Performance Institute really has created a roadmap that gives us tools and strategies, really actionable items to be able to implement into our lives. Really, habits that we can all develop regardless of what level we’re at career-wise. If you’re a stay-at-home mom to if you’re a Fortune 100 CEO, every single person has the ability to replicate these habits with the tools and strategies that are provided so that they can achieve what’s called High Performance. Which is really achieving heightened levels of sustained success over the norm. So really over that long term, rather than peak performance, which then you have a valley. It’s really that continuous growth and it’s about defining what success means for you. So many people look at success as really just one area, which oftentimes is financial. Sometimes it’s also associated with power or prestige and what your title is.

0:14:36.8 LW: But I used to define success as that as well. It was, okay, how quickly can I climb this corporate ladder? How quickly can I get into a place of influence? And then several things happened to where I started to redefine what that, what success really meant to me. Which now I look at it as, how many people can I positively impact throughout my life? What legacy do I get to leave? And how well balanced of a human am I? So what is my wellbeing? What are my relationships like? What is my spirituality practice and how deeply connected to that am I, how is my health? How is definitely the financial and career part, but more importantly, if I make an impact that also, that means even more to me than any other area. So it’s really about identifying what success means to each individual, because we’re all going to have different definitions.

0:15:38.1 WB: I love that so many people that we engage with set their success as an end state. It’s like, once I get to this point, I’m going to be successful. And as just as you said, they limit it, they focus in on one particular thing rather than realizing that success exists all around us or the areas of target exist all around us. And, so yeah, I very much like that direction. We’re going to talk in a moment about adversity and failure. Before that, you mentioned what you do with your work and helping people, I guess look at self-awareness within themself. Your company is called Awareness Elevations.

0:16:26.8 LW: Yes.

0:16:26.9 WB: And, I wonder if you could just introduce the company a little bit first and what it’s all about.

0:16:32.5 LW: Yeah, absolutely. So Awareness Elevation was actually founded by my business partner, James Pyle. And we’re a company of all certified high performance coaches who coach executives, entrepreneurs, physicians, educators and students, through actual one-on-one coaching, group coaching and also speaking. And so we do trainings and leadership workshops and then we have several partnerships with other companies to really be able to provide a comprehensive personal growth, professional growth and business growth platform and strategy to anybody in those categories really. And self-awareness is something that we refer to as step zero. So when we talk kind of about defining success, a lot of my executive clients haven’t really defined that and they haven’t defined what success means because they don’t necessarily know who they are or who they want to be. They kind of box themselves in to this perception of, oh, well, to be successful based off of society’s perception, I have to achieve X, Y, and Z.

0:17:51.8 LW: Whether that’s financial, whether it’s title, whether it’s something else. But so oftentimes, especially the ones later on in their career, it’s, I’ve hit that level of success financially or I’ve had been the CEO of three or four different major companies, but I’m not happy. I don’t have passion anymore. I don’t have drive anymore. I just, I kind of go from task to task really mundane and I don’t feel like I’m really making an impact anymore, and I don’t know what’s wrong. And so much of that starts with that step zero of becoming more self-aware. Who are you? Who would you be if the world never told you who to be? And what do you really want? And what are you really capable of? And when I say the world, it’s, we’d start to define ourselves from an early age.

0:18:47.0 LW: Usually based off of what we see or hear from our parents, the beliefs that we choose to accept, oftentimes subconsciously, especially when we’re that little. And we have to insert meaning into every single situation, and those situations and experiences start to drive the way that we see ourselves, what we’re capable of or what we should be doing. So society tells us that you’re only worth something if you’re a size two or size zero as a woman and have hit certain benchmarks financially or title wise in your career, or have done X, Y or Z, depending on what society you’re in and what your country of origin is. But each society, in each culture has their ideal version of what somebody who’s successful looks like.

0:19:34.7 WB: Right.

0:19:35.5 LW: And that doesn’t necessarily have to tie in with who we are or what our ideal version is. And when we try to live from that place, that’s not congruent or authentic to who we truly are, that’s when we start to not be as happy, not as fulfilled. And when we’re not as happy or fulfilled, we’re not as productive, we’re not as creative, we disconnect, we’re not as empathetic, we can’t relate as well to other people. And so we end up sacrificing relationships that research shows are really one of the fundamental components to overall long-term success, is having these positive relationships around us. And so it kind of turns into this just negative spiral if we don’t have that baseline level of self-awareness to know what we are or know what we want, who we are and who we want to be.

0:20:24.6 WB: I like throwing in self-regulation when we talk about self-awareness, because…

[laughter]

0:20:30.5 WB: Even when we reached that level of self-awareness, people still don’t necessarily take action to achieve or modify their behaviors to really become that changed person, right? So they can’t struggle with the regulation side of it and nothing ever changes. So I always look at self-awareness as the first half of the equation, and then the ability to self-regulate is really where the work or the rubber meets the road for me. I’m not sure if that’s the same view that you have.

0:21:01.6 LW: Yeah. [laughter] Absolutely, and that’s where a lot of times if people have self-awareness, it’s great, but what do you do with it? And apart for having the tools and the strategies and the techniques, and an actual roadmap to be able to create the positive change that you’re wanting is paramount and just so, so important.

0:21:23.0 WB: Yeah. So I was visualizing you 16 years old lying in a hospital bed, self-aware, understanding that you didn’t want this state, you wanted to return to life as it was before the accident, but you had to take the action. And this is something Tony Robbins talks about, right? Is no use having a lot of the knowledge if you do nothing with it.

0:21:46.4 LW: Right.

0:21:47.6 WB: And you really have to do something that’s going to change that state.

0:21:52.6 LW: Absolutely. Yeah, knowledge is not power, applied knowledge is power.

0:21:56.7 WB: Applied knowledge, yeah. That sort of transitions or segues into the conversation on failure. And I know you talk about primary causes of failure, so I wonder if you’d introduce that first place.

0:22:10.6 LW: Sure. So the four primary causes of failure really are kind of the four F’s, fear, frustration, fatigue and feeling all alone. And, how many times have you had something come up where maybe fear stopped you, “I’m afraid I won’t succeed, I’m afraid that I might not get that outcome or that I might be rejected.” Or any other situation that we play out in our mind, and sometimes depending on a relationship with fear, it can literally stop us in our tracks unless we start to learn how to reframe it and change our focus. Something that in the personal growth and high performance world that we always talk about is, you really do see more of what you focus on. There’s neurological reasons for that, but you don’t know any more that your fear of you not succeeding is going to happen any more than you do know that it will succeed, or you will succeed. So why not actually choose to focus on the outcomes that you want, and then at that point, we can tell our subconscious mind that let certain information pass into our conscious awareness to confirm whatever we’re focused on. And does that make sense when I say that? So there’s…

0:23:37.8 WB: It does, it makes sense to me at least.

[laughter]

0:23:40.8 LW: Okay. So there’s a part of our brain called the reticular activating system that actually it essentially serves as the filter between our conscious awareness and subconscious awareness. Our subconscious can process… There are so many different studies that throughout various numbers, but one of the bigger ones says around 11 million bits of information per second, whereas your conscious level of awareness can only process between 79 bits of information per second. So the RAS essentially allows the information that we tell it is important, to make it through that filtered into our conscious awareness, and so that’s why we start to see more of what we’re focused on because we’re trying to get our brains to tell us, “Yes, because this is what you said is important, you’re going to see that. So I’m going to succeed, okay, now you’re going to start seeing more ways that you can succeed or I’m going to fail, now, oh, this situation happened and so that must mean that this isn’t going to work. And it also impacts the meaning that we start to assign to different events. So choosing our focus really is one of the biggest ways and best way is to really overcome that fear.

0:24:47.6 WB: Yeah. The word choose or choice is so central, I believe, to the person we become, because we all have that capability to make that selection. We don’t realize it most of the time is the problem, and so it comes back to that self-awareness, self-regulation discussion, and there’s so many metaphors around what you just said. You become the questions you ask is one metaphor that already it came to mind when you were talking and there’s so much, right? So Robins talks about the power of decision making and the person you become as a result of the decisions you make. So all of these things really dovetail of that core of what you were just introducing. If I come to you as a client and I want to improve my performance as a leader, where do we start? What’s your approach with me in this area?

0:25:40.9 LW: So usually we would have you start with what’s called the High Performance Indicator Assessment, which really just gives a look into your likelihood to succeed in certain areas and what areas you can focus on specifically, to, so that you can increase and improve your performance. So that’s actually a free gift that I would love to offer any of your listeners and make sure that you have the link for that. But being able to take that pre-assessment, we don’t capture your results or anything like that, it’s simply a tool that you can use to really look at what areas in your life are going to be able to have the biggest bang for your buck in terms of the amount of time, energy, and effort that you put into developing those. But then also the ones that are going to move the needle the most. And from that, from those results, then we can develop kind of a custom game plan. There are certain baseline strategies that we give to everyone, but we’ll put a different level of emphasis on the areas that are unique to that individual to help them achieve their personal and professional goals.

0:26:50.1 WB: Fantastic, I will definitely be taking that.

0:26:52.4 LW: Yeah.

0:26:52.9 WB: And test as well.

0:26:54.3 LW: Absolutely.

0:26:55.3 WB: Yeah. So I look forward to that, I hadn’t read about it, but I really look forward to doing it. I just did a test recently with one of our guests who has a test around the Three Brains Theory, and there was some interesting results that came out of that. So I look forward to doing your test.

[laughter]

0:27:14.8 WB: Just seeing my areas of shortcoming or the guts that I have, so.

0:27:19.9 LW: Gut health is something that so many people overlook, because it’s really is a driver of our overall health and if we’re not healthy, our level of performance drops in every single area.

0:27:31.7 WB: You talk about habits, which is foundational, I guess to a lot of our performance, to change a habit seems like such a daunting process. How do you work with your clients to be able to help them stay the course until they have enough momentum to make that change?

0:27:53.2 LW: Absolutely. So it kind of depends on the person. And it… One of the biggest factors that helps in people actually creating that change, is being able to determine why it’s necessary to change.

0:28:10.8 WB: Right.

0:28:11.0 LW: And so some of it is first identifying their why, second of all is if and when you change, how is this going to help you? If you don’t change and you stay the same, how is it going to hurt you?

0:28:25.2 WB: Yes.

0:28:25.8 LW: And then one layer outside of that, who else will it help if you improve in this area? Will it help your team as a leader? Well, if your team’s performance improves because your performance improves, how does that impact your customer satisfaction? How does that improve your customer retention? How does it impact your revenue and creativity and ability to build your business in the way that you’re wanting? Or if you don’t and you choose to stay the same, what are you going to lose, because you didn’t change? Are you going to start having more employee turnover? Are your team members going to become less engaged, not as attentive to customer needs or not as creative, because now they’re fearful of your response and they’re not willing to take those risks to improve in the areas that you’re really wanting them to improve in, to change the business in the direction that you wanna, to make it. And so how do we create this roadmap for you in a way that now that you’re bought in fully, and this all comes from them, it’s not a, I’m going to tell you what to do, it’s a looking at your own life, I don’t know, you and never will know you as well as you know yourself. But I can help you learn to get to know yourself even better so that you can make these informed decisions and really generate those… That necessity to change.

0:29:50.4 LW: And then from there, it’s kind of a stepwise process. So some people, it’s okay, let’s just practice the one to three habits that you’re really focused on this week or this month for just two minutes a day, or maybe it’s 20 minutes a day or a certain timeframe that seems manageable. And so it kind of depends on where they’re at in the progression of their overall change and how dramatic and how quickly they’re wanting to change. So it’s kind of diagnosing if you go into a physician office and they’re doing the assessment to really diagnose your specific illness or ailment and then the course of treatment that’s specific to you, that’s kind of how the coaching relationship works as well.

0:30:32.7 WB: Right, right. And there’s some great books of course around habit formation and changing habits, Charles Duhigg and James Clear, and then on the other side you have things like thinking traps, I’m not sure how much you know about or go into talking about thinking traps, the negative talk, self-talk that we have. And when we’re confronted by something, there’s so many angles we can come at, so that’s why I was asking the question how as a coach you would support those people. If we look at the speaking for a moment, because I know there’s a close connection here with what you’re doing between educating, as well as introducing people towards better communication through speaking, could you talk a little bit around that for us?

0:31:22.6 LW: Yeah. One of the things that we’ve found and that I’ve personally really fallen in love with, is being able to reach a larger number of people through speaking. So if it’s one-on-one coaching, it’s awesome, I get a lot out of that and get a ton of joy from that and hope that my clients do as well. However, you’re limited by time, whereas if you’re speaking and looking at those audiences of a hundred to 10,000, a million people, you get to make such a bigger impact, and…

0:31:56.4 WB: Right.

0:31:56.7 LW: That’s where becoming more comfortable on stage and really learning how to tell those stories in a way that bring up good points that connect with people. And it’s kind of that one thing that everybody expects you to do flawlessly, but that we’re never actually taught how to do.

0:32:20.0 WB: Yeah.

0:32:20.5 LW: Which is communicate, and so a lot of, especially as a leader, one of those things is learning those communication skills which can drive your influence, but that changes outcomes. It allows you to become more persuasive and have people decrease that natural tendency of skepticism and opposition to whatever you’re going to say, because we have that natural bias of self-preservation and self-protection. And so we look at everybody just from the way that our biology is, from a place of skepticism and so how do we actually craft messages in a way that allow us to help other people decrease those defenses from the beginning. And also go in and leave a lasting impression to help inspire change.

0:33:15.6 WB: Right.

0:33:15.7 LW: And so one of the areas that my team has really found a passion in recently is going and speaking in schools. And we’ve partnered with an organization that is called Top School Speakers, who their CEO has spoken in schools for 15 years and is known as America’s number one youth motivator. And when we get the opportunity to start at that young of an age, to start inspiring those questions of who are you and who would you be if the world never told you who you could be, how much more of an impact do we get to make over the course of their lifetime? And so we’ve actually partnered with them to start training other people who are… Who have similar passions to go into those fairly low risk environments, to be able to make a huge impact, to share their story in a compelling way and to really start to make and leave that lasting legacy. But at the same time, learning those speaking skills and being in front of students can also help you be, perform better in your overall career. Because you’re starting to learn how to communicate, how to do persuasive selling from stage, or persuasive selling during a meeting, or to a customer or to your kid trying to tell them that they just need to go to bed or do their homework.

0:34:39.8 WB: There’s a… It’s a double-edged sword, right? And then there’s a win-win on both sides. So are you improving your own communication skills, you’re having the opportunity to stand up in front of a group of people, and as you said practice what you need to as a leader. But also you are able to then give back or give something to the younger generation, I think that’s a beautiful course. How would people get involved with this if they wanted to learn more about that?

0:35:07.9 LW: Yeah. By going to our website, awarenesselevation.com and then clicking under our programs and courses. And we have the top speaker playbook that we do ongoing live courses and coaching, so there’s a digital version option, but the way that people really get the best opportunity, because we actually put people on stage in front of students and give them those opportunities to speak once they’ve met certain criteria. And we vet them to make sure that they’re delivering a good solid message that is deserving to be heard by youth and is inspiring and really serving a positive purpose. But by looking into that, we’re happy to schedule just a free strategy call and see if that might be something that would be a good fit or what course of action they might be able to take to get to the level that they’re wanting to get to. Whether that’s in their leadership skills, their personal growth, their professional development or their speaking career.

0:36:08.9 WB: And just for the listeners, you can probably already sense by LynAnn’s smooth fluent delivery that she’s a very highly regarded public speaker in America and so very modest as well.

laughter

0:36:23.6 WB: So you have a great place if people are interested, you have a great foundation to start from there. Are you working on anything new at the moment? Any books in the pipeline, any new programs perhaps?

0:36:41.5 LW: Yeah. A couple of different things actually. So we’ll have our High Performance Leadership playbook that should be coming out within the next several months and that’s really… So many books are written in a way that it’s great reading material, you get to go through it as a kind of a story, but this will really be a, I have this problem, what do I do? Okay, go to this chapter. Or, and it’ll have a course that comes along with it. And so with additional resources and materials that people can use to implement specific tools and strategies to really address some of their biggest challenges that are top of mind at the moment. And then another course that we’re working on is really geared more towards my healthcare community and helping people really grow businesses especially in the healthcare realm. But it’s applicable for entrepreneurs and large of all, probably more small to medium-sized businesses as well.

0:37:46.7 WB: Right. What was the release date for the book, do you know yet?

0:37:51.4 LW: We don’t have that quite yet, but I’ll make sure and let you know once we do.

0:37:55.8 WB: Okay. And do you have a title?

0:37:58.9 LW: The High Performance Leadership Playbook. [chuckle]

0:38:01.2 WB: Okay. Very good. LynAnn, great conversation, I’m just wondering as we wrap up, is there any final words of wisdom that you’d like to leave with our listeners in relation to the work that you’re doing, in relation to the work they’re doing?

0:38:17.9 LW: Really taking a look at how you can improve your self-awareness, because self-awareness drives your thoughts, and your thoughts start to drive your actions. And when we learn how to become more self-aware, to ask ourselves those questions, that can really change our direction or the way that we’re thinking. It allows us to drive and change our actions, which changes our outcomes. And so as many people like to think that an organization can’t be changed by one person, it really can, and it doesn’t even have to be the leader at the very top. The more aware that we become, the more aware of others and the way that we think, the way that we react, the way that we respond or get to choose how to respond to situations, can change the way that we experience our workplace, the way that others experience their workplace or their life. And it starts to create this incredible ripple effect, that can touch the lives of so many more people than who you’ll ever even know. But the first step in becoming a great leader is really becoming a leader of self first. So what actions do you need to take, to become a better version of you so that you can lead at a higher level?

0:39:41.5 WB: Very powerful. Where can people come and connect with you if they wanna learn more about what LynAnn Weaver is doing?

0:39:49.6 LW: So on most social media channels, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, I just launched my TikTok, we’ll see how that one goes. But also via email at lynann@awarenesselevation.com.

0:40:06.4 WB: So, LynAnn, great conversation as expected, really appreciate you taking the time, the opportunity to share your insights. So thank you. Thank you for being on the ET Project.

0:40:18.9 LW: Thank you so much for having me and hopefully I’ve added some value for your listeners as well.

[music]

0:40:24.9 Speaker 3: Thank you for joining us on the ET Project, a show for executive talent development. Until next time, check out our site for free videos, eBooks, webinars and blogs at coachingforcompanies.com.

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