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ET Project \ Podcasts

ET-086: Triumph over Trials: The Inspiring Narrative of a Business Leader’s Journey to Success

With Ms. Marnie Del Beauchamp

ET-086: A conversation with Ms. Marnie Del Beauchamp

and your host Wayne Brown on January 30, 2024

Episode notes: A conversation with Ms. Marnie Del Beauchamp

Hello and welcome to the ET Project. I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and as usual, we’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET.

Today I have the chance to head back home to Australia and visit our guest Ms Marnie Beauchamp who is sitting in Shellharbour, on the southern coast of NSW in the Illawarra region.

Marnie Beauchamp is an award winning business leader, bestselling Author and a Coach who is revitalizing the business landscape for women.

With over 24 years in business ownership, Marnie has built four start up businesses plus the acquisition of three existing businesses.

Here is an extract from our conversation as we start to get into it…

The most pressing thought for me and what always drives me forward is just that, that I don’t even know what it is. There’s just something inside me that just never wants to give up. And I’m always looking for something more. I’m always looking for how I can better myself and how I can inspire others. I think the big thing at the moment for me as opposed to, I guess, my journey and doing what I wanna do for me is helping how I can inspire and help others. Because that’s been my passion over the years with building my businesses is in mentoring the teams and growing them as people in their own right and helping them to achieve their success. So I would say that what drives me at the moment is that more so than my goals and that sort of thing…

Today’s Guest: MS MARNIE DEL BEAUCHAMP

Marnie is a leading former business person of the year who is revolutionizing the way that new business owners are able to truly thrive. Marnie is a visionary who has developed enviable skills and knowledge over the past 24 years.
Her bespoke approach has been instrumental in helping others to break down barriers, build resilience and find the tenacity to face fears, conquer challenges and overcome obstacles to achieve both short-term and long-term success.
Her accomplishments are impressive and include Business Person of the Year, Overall Business of the Year and her Real Estate Agencies won on multiple occasions for the best business in their industry category.

But what truly makes Marnie unique is her never give up mindset.

To say that she has faced many challenges, obstacles and adversity over the years would be an understatement. Her latest venture is her book which soared to bestseller status overnight in multiple categories including “Women & Business” on Amazon.

Final words from Marnie:

I think you’ve just got to find something, you’ve just got to keep looking for something that’s going to help you to continue to move forward, whether it’s your family, whether it’s a goal, whether it’s you can find somebody that you can talk to that’s going to inspire you, but it’s just not giving up, like it doesn’t matter what you face or how hard things are, you only fail if you give up, essentially.

So for me sometimes it takes time and sometimes you’ve got to wallow in that moment and there’s nothing wrong with going through that emotion ’cause I believe that it’s better than burying it, because I think burying it just causes anxiety and all sorts of other things, so there’s nothing wrong with feeling the trauma and all that sort of thing.

But the main thing is that you’ve just got to remember that you can’t do it indefinitely, you’ve just got to find that strength to get up and keep moving forward and find something that’s gonna shift the energy, shift that whole momentum that you’ve got…

0:00:00.0 Wayne Brown: Hello, I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and welcome to the ET Project. We’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world, whom we’re affectionately referring to as team ET. And today I have the chance to head back home to Australia and visit our guest Ms. Marnie Beauchamp, who’s sitting in Shell Harbor on the southern coast of New South Wales in the Illawarra region. Marnie’s an award-winning business leader, bestselling author, and a coach who’s revitalizing the business landscape for women. With over 24 years in business ownership, Marnie has built four startup businesses, plus acquired three others. She’s revolutionizing the way that new business owners are able to truly thrive. Marnie is a visionary who’s developed enviable skills and knowledge throughout her career. Her bespoke approach has been instrumental in helping others to break down barriers to build resilience, and find tenacity in the face of fear, conquering challenges and overcoming obstacles to achieve both short and long-term success. Her accomplishments are impressive and include business person of the year, overall business of the year, and her real estate agencies won on multiple occasions for the best business in their industry category.

0:01:16.1 WB: But what truly makes Marnie unique is her never-give-up mindset. To say that she’s faced many challenges, obstacles, and adversity over the years would truly be an understatement. Her latest venture is her book, which soared to bestseller status overnight in multiple categories, including women in business on Amazon. Marnie has survived many highs and lows, most of which would stop many people in their tracks, but rather than give in, she got back up over and over again and used the lessons learned along the way to rebuild a life and her business, which exceeded all expectations. Team ET, you’ll hear me refer to Marnie as being in a similar league with legends such as the unstoppable David Goggins. And once you listen to this conversation and read her book, I’m fairly confident that you’ll understand why. So please prepare yourself for this journey, the experiences, as well as the insights shared by our guest, Ms. Marnie Beauchamp as we learn to crush limiting beliefs and hold a mindset that you are enough and with the right team around you, everything is possible.

0:02:26.2 Speaker 2: Welcome to the ET project, a podcast for those executive talents determined to release their true potential and create an impact. Join our veteran coach and mentor Wayne Brown as we unpack an exciting future together.

0:02:40.9 WB: Hello, welcome team ET. Today is truly a special episode that we’ve got lined up for you. It’s about true grit as well as determination, resilience, perseverance, all of the buzzwords you wanna talk about. We’ve got them. I would say above all, it’s about crushing limiting beliefs and holding a mindset that we are enough as we are and with the right team around us everything’s possible. And I think many of you will probably have heard me talk about my book fetish. I love to consume and learn from those that have taken the time to simplify what I term as the complexity of their life and then translate it into print. And typically we share journeys, experiences, life lessons, insights, whether that’s business, leadership, personal transitions, I’m all in. And therefore, you may have noticed that many of my guests are authors as well as industry leaders.

0:03:41.8 WB: So there’s a great chance that today we’re going to have another author. And of course, that’s the case, not only an author, but so much has happened in our guest’s life, and we’re going to be unpacking that through the book that she’s just released back in October. The book is called Unread Pages, the Silent Struggle Between Every Success, and literally that’s the title explains our guest’s rollercoaster life. So with that said, please join me in welcoming Ms. Marnie Del Beauchamp, to the ET Project. Marnie, welcome. It’s such a pleasure to have you with us.

0:04:25.5 Marnie Beauchamp: Thank you so much. It’s great to be here.

0:04:28.8 WB: I would normally ask our guests to share a little bit about their journey and the key milestones along the way, but your book does such a great job in bringing all that to life. So we’re gonna unpack that during our discussion. Instead, what I’d like to take a moment and acknowledge, is you’re such a warrior, it’s been a heck of a ride through your life up until this point. And at the end of the book, and I’m basing my comments now, to the listeners, I’m basing my comments on what I’ve read through the book. So I don’t know Marnie personally, but it seems like at this point in your life, you’ve now arrived at a different place than where you were not so long ago through the coaching and what I’m really curious about, and I’m wondering as you wake up each day, what’s the most pressing thought that that really drives you and keeps you moving forward?

0:05:31.2 MB: Oh, actually that’s a tough one.

[laughter]

0:05:33.7 MB: I think the most… [laughter] Start with a bang. [laughter] the most pressing thought for me and what always drives me forward is just that, that I don’t even know what it is. There’s just something inside me that just never wants to give up. And I’m always looking for something more. I’m always looking for how I can better myself and how I can inspire others. I think the big thing at the moment for me as opposed to, I guess, my journey and doing what I wanna do for me is helping how I can inspire and help others. Because that’s been my passion over the years with building my businesses is in mentoring the teams and growing them as people in their own right and helping them to achieve their success. So I would say that what drives me at the moment is that more so than my goals and that sort of thing.

0:06:30.9 WB: Right.

0:06:31.7 MB: Although I do have my app, I’m really pushing it [chuckle] to get out there. [laughter]

0:06:37.3 WB: Very good.

0:06:37.5 MB: I think that’s clear.

0:06:38.6 WB: We’ll get into all of that as we go through the conversation.

0:06:50.1 MB: Yeah, yeah.

0:06:55.6 WB: As I read through the book, I have to say, I love the book. As I read through…

0:07:03.1 MB: Thank you.

0:07:08.0 WB: Another person came to mind that your life tends to, I won’t say mimic their life because it’s not about that, but David Goggins, I know we spoke about David Goggins the first time we connected. You know, if you, if any of the listeners have read David Goggins, he’s got two books out now. The first was Can’t Hurt Me, a great book, but last year he released a book called Never Finished. And for me it was even better than the first book. And when I read…

0:07:23.8 MB: Yeah.

0:07:23.8 WB: Your book, for me there’s so many similarities in, not so much in the life, but in the mindset and your approach to never giving up. And I think that’s one of the phrases that you use. You have this enormous ability, this resilience to keep getting up, to keep moving forward regardless of how many setbacks you’ve faced, how many times you’ve been knocked down. So to my point, you’re really a warrior and it was a great read. So thank you for publishing.

0:08:02.7 MB: It’s a pleasure. I really appreciate that feedback. And that seems to be the majority of what people are saying and what’s resonating with them is the fact that, you know, a lot of that stuff, the reason I call it the secret struggles behind every success is because it’s not stuff that we talk about, right? When we’re, you know, going through life, and especially as business owners and things like that, you kind of have this, you know, I guess this inner, strength that you have no choice but to have. But it’s not something that you, the hard times aren’t things that you want to share. They’re things that you just get on with, well, as far as I’m concerned, anyway. So, so many people didn’t know about those hard times. And so a lot of people have been coming back to me that have known me or do know me over the years and said, I had no idea that you’re going through all of that stuff along the way. So, yeah, it’s just, it was a hard thing to do, though. It was quite cathartic, but putting yourself out there like that and sharing a lot of that stuff with the world wasn’t an easy thing initially. But once I started writing and I sort of started getting into it, I could see the power that it could have in helping others, empowering others.

0:09:14.5 WB: We, we’ll unpack it in more detail, but I had to smile to myself that you you have so many things that have happened that sometimes you just do a, like a trauma dump during the book, [laughter] like stalker, surgery, your mother passing away, you know, all… Divorce and you dump it all on one page type of thing. So it was quite a read. [laughter]

0:09:47.0 MB: And that’s what I do. I tend to have my little moments where I have my little, like, oh, and then I go, you know what? I’m just gonna lean into this. I’m going to find out what it’s going to teach me. And I’m just gonna, I feel like my whole, my whole thing is that the sooner that you actually lean into these things and let yourself feel and go through those emotions, the easier it is to then start to move on. Otherwise, it just drags you down indefinitely. So, yeah.

0:10:16.6 WB: Yeah. I love that. There’s a great saying that Goggins made me rethink about it. And then reading your book, I ‘ve written it down because it reminded me of it. I ‘m not sure where it comes from. I have a feeling it’s a Buddhist saying, it goes back some way. It’s, pain is inevitable, suffering is optional. And as I read your book, that rings so true in your mind and your approach to dealing with adversity. So yeah, I like that saying, but having read your book, I can really, really understand it. So again, the book is called Unread Pages, the Silent Struggle Between Every Success. It’s a really personal account. What was the motivation for putting pen to paper in the first place?

0:11:08.5 MB: I’ve always had, I’ve always loved writing, and I’ve always had a dream of writing a book. And I actually started writing another book, which will probably be my second book, but the other book was more a bit of a real estate agent survival guide, I guess [laughter] or the thing that I’d really tell you when you go into the industry. And I started writing that, and then I started to think about my journey and all the things that I’ve encountered and faced along the way, not only within the real estate, but within business. And I had a publisher that reached out to me and through a, I think it was just through a Facebook post in a group that I’m in about writing books. And we started to talk about what I would have to write about and content and that sort of thing.

0:11:55.8 MB: And then during that process I talked to her about my journey, and she was the one that said to me, Marnie, that’s what you need to write about. That needs to be your first book. That’s your leverage, that’s your, you know, that shows what you’ve actually faced up to and overcome. So yeah, so that’s sort of where it came from. And that’s when I sort of started to think about writing about my life. And people have said to me over the years, many times, you need to write a book, you need to write a book. But I guess I just didn’t know whether it was going to be something people would want to hear. You know, you always go through that process, especially when it’s about your life, you think, well, is it gonna be interesting? Are are other people going to take something from it? So, took me a little bit to get over that, but then as my friend said to me, Marn, it doesn’t matter if it’s going to be something that you’re gonna enjoy and it’s gonna be a dream for you to write a book, then do it. So, yeah.

0:12:50.0 WB: Very nice. Well, I’m pleased that whoever prompted you and whatever it took to get all this on paper, thank you. It’s again, a great read and I really encourage listeners to get out there and find it. It’s probably available on Amazon, I guess is the best place to find it, or is it in the bookstores?

0:13:10.3 MB: Yeah, so if you just… Yeah, absolutely. Yeah. So if you just search my name and it’s actually The Silent Struggles Behind Every Success, then yeah, you’ll find it, it comes up. So there’s an ebook and a paperback version available in Australia; in the States you can get the hardcover. It’s also on Barnes & Noble. Global distribution to bookstores is going to be happening in the next 4-6 weeks. So it’s only fairly new to the market, so yeah, only been maybe three months now and then… Two months, sorry. And then the audio book, sorry, the audio book is due to be out, I think I’ll get the final edits today, so I’m hoping to have that up on Audible within the next week, by the end of this week, yeah, which is pretty exciting. A lot of are people waiting for the audio book, so yeah.

0:14:00.5 WB: Yeah. I may even get it on audio as well, so very good. Okay, let’s start to work our way through the book, and as I said, I don’t want to go through chapter by chapter and give the whole plot away but there’s moments in the book where you share insights or personal learnings as you’ve been through the journey that really resonates with what I like to to see as an outcome. So maybe if we just look at the broad context and then we can talk more about those those learnings from it. So teenage years, it sounded like a pretty tumultuous period in your life.

0:14:49.0 MB: Yeah it was, it was, you know, I look back and I think compared to what a lot of kids go through, it wasn’t so bad, but we all handle things differently and with my personality I think you know there was definitely times there where I felt really challenged and I felt really uncomfortable and I felt very much out of my comfort zone. And I think being brought up in that environment where my dad was a real go-getter and, you know, as I spoke about in the book, he loved anything to do with speed, fast racing speed, and so I was always very close to my dad, so whatever he did I wanted to do, so my whole business desire to have my business came from him as well. But yes, teenage years were a little bit tumultuous.

0:15:35.9 MB: My parents separated at a time where I was probably at one of my most impressionable ages and anything like that where there’s confrontations and a combative environment is hard and especially for kids. So I took a lot of learning out of that when I’ve now been through the same situation, my girls were very young when I separated from their dad, so I took a lot from that and made sure that when that happened with us that both my husband and I put our kids first and they were never involved in any of the… Anything at all, so it’s meant that their upbringing has always been just full of love and support from both of us, which has been great.

0:16:20.6 WB: One of the things you developed as a result, you talk about the need to be able to please others or to help others and not disappoint. How did that come about like was there a particular trigger that set you on that path, like what was the moment where you realized that?

0:16:43.8 MB: I didn’t realize that until adult life, to be honest with you, and writing the book again reinstated that probably the timing where it actually happened, but how it’s actually developed so much over the years without me even being aware of it. And as soon as I became aware of it, it made it much easier for me to manage it, but yes, I think one, being the only girl in the family and wanting to do everything my dad did and my brothers did, I always had that desire to make him proud of me and that was probably the beginning of it and to keep up with them so I always sort of pushed myself in whatever I did to make sure that I did it really well, so that I was up there with where they were. But then I think when the family dynamic started to change and some other things happened, it definitely made me take responsibility for that and I don’t know why I took responsibility for that but I did and I blamed myself for the family dynamic falling apart, and maybe it was my fault that dad wasn’t there anymore and all that sort of stuff so, which is not true at all.

0:17:53.8 MB: And obviously over the years with maturity, I spoke to them both and learned some more about the situation and everything, so that obviously helped but I definitely had this drive to always make sure that everyone’s happy, take responsibility for other people, look after everybody else, put everybody else first and that’s what I have done my whole life. It’s almost been impossible for me to say no to somebody until yeah, as I said, until I started to recognize what I was doing, I had this desire, this perfectionist desire that is impossible to achieve. I mean perfection is not a thing, right? I mean nobody’s perfect, but for me I think that’s why I pushed myself so hard was ’cause I never felt like I was living up to my own expectations, not anyone else’s, they were just my own.

0:18:47.0 WB: How much did that play out as you started to move into business? Was that still something in the back of your psyche about the business needs to be successful so that I look successful and therefore I please other people? Was that part of the driving force?

0:19:10.2 MB: Yeah, it was part of the driving force. I think I… It’s really weird when I, as I say in the book, when I went into especially that first business everyone was saying to me, are you sure? What if it doesn’t work? But I never ever consider that it didn’t work. I think because I have spent my whole life pushing myself and getting to where I wanted to be by doing that, that I had that confidence in myself. So it’s definitely been a driving factor. And that’s why the bad that comes with it, with that, the stuff, the turmoil inside when you’re not living up to your expectations and the the self-control and all that kind of stuff when things don’t go the way you want them to, that’s obviously been the negative, but the positives has been giving me that drive and giving me that confidence and belief in myself that if I really work hard enough and I try and do everything that I know I need to do, then I can achieve anything. So yeah, it’s been a big part of it, I believe anyway. Yeah.

0:20:12.8 WB: You also have a great learning coming out of it that all of life’s experiences happen for a reason. And that seems to be a theme or a thread throughout the book. When did you realize that? Is it only in hindsight now that you see that?

0:20:29.8 MB: Yeah, [laughter] it is only in hindsight. I started to, I go through stages where I think, oh my god, has the universe got it in for me? Why am I facing another challenge now? But then as I say in the book, I don’t believe that that’s the case. I believe that it’s because it’s still teaching me stuff and it’s making me realize that I need to trust my gut and I need to have, I guess, that confidence in me to have my own space and to look after me first and foremost, which has been a hard thing over the years. But it’s something that I’ve definitely learned and taking, writing the book just reinforced a lot of that stuff for me. And that’s why I wanted to put the takeaways in there as well because it’s not, it’s not all doom and gloom. Yes, it’s hard and life’s always going to be hard but there’s always a silver lining, right? And I think…

0:21:21.1 WB: If you’re open to it…

0:21:23.4 MB: If you’re open to it, yeah, that’s right. I mean, a lot of people are not and they’re stuck and the only reason you’re stuck is ’cause you’re living in the past, in my opinion. You’ve just got to constantly keep moving forward and I have another really good saying that I love and that is that if you don’t change, then you’re choosing. So you’re choosing to be in that situation. You’re choosing to feel those feelings over and over again. If we want our lives to change, then we have to change. It’s as simple as that.

0:21:51.0 WB: Right, right. There may be some psychologists on the listener base and I’m sure they would love to jump in here and elaborate on that, but that’s not my field.

0:22:03.4 MB: No, no, no.

0:22:07.8 WB: You achieved so much early in life. So we’ve touched on teenage years but already, I think, you went into work at 18 and by 21, or maybe even before 21, right, if I remember in the book, you take your first trip overseas. It was going to be with your best friend and then she couldn’t go, so you set off overseas by yourself. Step us through that, the anxiety that must have existed around that. Here you are, a young Aussie girl, obviously loved her family, did everything and now you’re about to set off overseas on this adventure. Admittedly, her auntie is over in England but you’re heading off into the great unknown by yourself. It must have been quite the journey at the beginning.

0:23:03.3 MB: It was. It was actually very, very daunting. I was only, I’d only just turned 18, so I started work at 17, just turned 18 and I guess, the friend that I was going with, we’d been mates since we were four years old, so she was more like a sister to me, and I had so much confidence going with her. And then all of a sudden I was just stuck and I thought what do I do and, as I said to you, I had initially thought I’m just gonna wait until she’s ready and I’m so glad I didn’t because I don’t think she would have ever been ready. To this day she’s never done anything like that. So I just, yeah, my parents were the ones that said to me you can do this, you don’t need anybody else, you can do this. And I am a bit of an introvert when it comes to social situations; I’m not one that’s very comfortable walking up and just introducing myself to people and things like that. I’m getting better at it, but at that time it was a massive, massive thing for me to do that. So a lot of tears, a lot of nerves, I was shaking like a leaf when I got on that plane and, yeah, but it turned out to be one of the best things I ever did. It just, it instilled that confidence in me that I should just jump into the unknown, I should take these leaps of faith because they turn out to be the best things that ever happen to me every time I do it.

0:24:21.1 WB: Yeah.

0:24:21.3 MB: So it was an opportunity that I knew that if I let it go, I would spend the rest of my life kicking myself and I probably wouldn’t have gotten there. So I’m really, really thankful that I did it and it was, it was amazing. It was amazing and it just, even just instilling that confidence in me in being on my own and having to fend for myself. Those days there was no ability to, there was no mobile phones, there was no email, there was no social media, so I had no contact really with my family except for finding local pay phones and all that sort of stuff and postcards.

0:25:00.9 WB: You have a comment that you refer to a lot in the book, it’s called the sliding door moments. It’s essentially the transitions or moments in your career or in your life when something has happened and then you also have the tidal wave and the tidal wave tends to be the trauma, the sliding door moment tends to be the opportunity, and that’s how I, that’s my, me paraphrasing what you’ve said.

0:25:26.0 MB: Right. Yeah, that’s right.

0:25:27.2 WB: You fall into an opportunity to become an accountant essentially or to work in accounting and as you say in the book, you have no passion whatsoever for maths or for accounting and yet you end up doing, I think you go to college or university and study three years, thereabouts, I guess, to get to get your qualifications. Is that what happened?

0:25:56.7 MB: Yeah, I did. I was offered that opportunity and obviously, as you said, it wasn’t something that I really wanted to do. It wasn’t, certainly wasn’t, I wasn’t even good at maths at school, so see, I don’t know how we’re gonna go here, but I thought this thing, this opportunity has come to me for a reason and knowing that I had wanted a business and things like that, I thought, well, it’s gonna be a great foundation to build a business, having that financial knowledge. I took that opportunity and I ran with it and I thought, I’m just gonna see where this ends up and I could have had an awesome career in accounting. I at 21, I was traveling all over Australia to all of our subsidiary companies, doing their quarterly accounts and things like that, which at my age and whatever was a pretty big thing, but ultimately, I knew it wasn’t where I wanted to be, but it’s, I don’t regret doing it whatsoever and it’s definitely helped me a lot over the years.

0:26:58.4 WB: Yeah, it’s interesting. How do you find, I’m jumping around the place at the moment, but based on that, with AI and the developments in AI, how is that helping from a financial perspective in business today? Like have you had experience with the changes that that’s making based on your accounting background?

0:27:21.6 MB: Yeah, not a lot because I haven’t really jumped too much into the AI, except from the real estate perspective, but I do know that there’s a lot, so much more out there that can help these days. Nothing’s really done manually you know what I mean? Everything is just much easier, more streamlined and then it’s much easier to print off the reports and stuff. And even with things like Xero and stuff like that it’s, as long as you input the data, you can pull out whatever you want, whereas we didn’t have that in those days. I think, yeah, I think it had a really big impact for me early on and then, obviously, I wasn’t going to do my own accounts as my business grew, so I had bookkeepers and accountants and all that sort of thing, which took over anyway, but just being able to know what my key numbers were, what my financial dashboard had to look like, being able to do my cash flow forecasts, all that kind of stuff was really powerful, especially when it came to the second round of businesses, joining that new franchise, they’re all the things that I had to supply to them and I know now with a lot of my clients, when they go into business, they don’t know how to do any of that stuff, so it’s definitely come in handy to help with all of that.

0:28:37.9 WB: Things have tended to appear in front of you and you jumped at it with both feet and both hands. So you transitioned then from accounting into, I guess, real estate?

0:28:50.6 MB: Yeah, I did. I transitioned initially into property development, which again, as you said, just came out of nowhere and I was thinking I don’t know anything about real estate or property or it certainly wasn’t a career path that was on my radar at all, but again, it was exciting and I thought, well, it’s gonna be something new, something I can learn and so why not give it a go? And that’s what I did and five years in the development industry before I, another opportunity presented itself and then I ended up in residential real estate sales, residential and I did some development work as well.

0:29:27.6 WB: Yeah.

0:29:28.3 MB: But yeah, I don’t know, I’m a big believer in opportunities presenting themselves if you are open to it. And someone said to me one day and I don’t know if it’s true that we get something like 126 new opportunities every day that nobody even realizes to change our lives and take a new path. It’s funny, so yeah, I don’t know if that’s true but it was interesting when they said that.

0:29:55.7 WB: Again, you grab it with both hands, you dive in. Within 12 months, you’ve actually become the sole owner, you’ve purchased the other half of the business.

0:30:08.1 MB: Yeah, so I was actually a bit older, I was sort of just mid to late 20s, but yeah, I had that conversation. My dad said to me, because I turned out that I actually love real estate and I was quite good at it, I was transforming that business anyway and my dad said to me, you should have a chat to the franchisor who owned that business and say to him if he ever wanted to sell a share or whatever that you’d be interested. And I said, Well okay, thinking it would be well and truly down the track but it wasn’t and yeah, he offered me a 50% share because I think that he, just that first year that I was there, he could see what I was doing and I guess that was going to be a good opportunity for him as well because he wasn’t spending any time in the business really. And then after the next year, the business just took off, I was employing new people, I increased the profitability by over 400% in that first year and so I just thought to myself, I’m doing this and again, I obviously then had that confidence that this, all this stuff was happening because of me and what I was doing, so I thought, why not buy all of it and just take the reins and not have to share 50% of all this profit and all this stuff that I was doing without much input, which is fine, that’s just the way it was, he was more of a silent partner but yeah, so that’s what I did.

0:31:37.3 MB: Again, it was just that timing and everything for me probably wasn’t great but I just knew that if I didn’t do it then, I would again, I would be down the track. It’d be a harder thing to do because the business was just going to get better and better and then I was going to be having to pay more money for it. So I thought I’d do it now and then put all the effort in.

0:32:00.1 WB: One of the things that stood out to me in many of the transactions or the businesses is your work ethic. I’m wondering, is that also something that you gleaned from your father or was that more of an inherent trait that you seem to have? So you’re a very hard worker, you’re very diligent and you had this mindset that you wanted to always be the best at what you were doing. Where did that come from?

0:32:34.2 MB: Yeah. I think some of it must have come from my dad, he was a hard worker as well, he worked long hours and he was always very determined, he never had a mindset that something might not work out. So I think there’s definitely an element that came from him, but I think also those things that I built up in myself about the perfectionism and the wanting to make people proud of me, I think that was also a big part of it, that kind of just amplified what I’d gotten from my dad over the years and that in itself I think was what just pushed me. I just never, I didn’t ever want, I mean, I talk about failure as a lesson and we all fail every day, we fail, sometimes you set your alarm and you don’t get up, that’s failing essentially, but I don’t know if it was I didn’t want to fail, I don’t think I ever thought about failure, I think it was more that I just knew that I wanted it to be successful and I wanted it to be the best that it could be. Yeah, so that meant doing whatever it took basically.

0:33:44.8 WB: Right. You also talk about having to learn to become a leader and you list out, I’m not going to go through it now but in one of the chapters…

0:33:52.1 MB: Yeah.

0:33:54.2 WB: Excuse me, you list out some of the things that you had to work on in becoming a leader, demonstrating competence, being open to learning et cetera. How did you learn these things, was it through hands-on experience, did you do study, like a combination of both, what was the process?

0:34:17.6 MB: So I think it was mostly hands-on experience but I did get some business books and I was reading a lot of stuff and talking to my dad and things like that, but most of all it was just working in that environment and knowing how I would feel. So I always put myself in other people’s shoes and think well, if I was in this situation, how would I want that person to treat me, how would I expect them to treat me, what would make me work harder? And so for me, that’s what I always think about as a leader, I don’t ever have that I’m the boss, you’re the employee mentality, that’s just not me. The way I work is by creating connection with empathy and finding out what it is that my team expect from me and being there for them, showing up for them, supporting them and helping them with their growth. A lot of people can just excel so much with nurturing or most people, saying about the flower doesn’t grow if it’s in the wrong environment, right? So for me that’s what it was all about and I think that that was just an innate thing, I don’t remember ever learning about that anywhere, but as I said, I came into the business literally as a trainee and then I was their boss within no time, 12 months, and they were all a lot older, like they all had a good 40 years on me and they’d been in the industry for a very long time so I couldn’t expect to come in there and for them just to respect me.

0:35:42.6 MB: And I couldn’t expect to come in there and for them to take my lead and start doing everything that I wanted to do. And so I just made sure that I earned their respect first, I kept asking them how I could help them, I kept talking to them about where I wanted to take the business, getting their advice, if there was things that I wasn’t sure about, I would ask them. There’s no harm, just because you’re the leader doesn’t mean that you can’t learn from your staff, you can’t learn from other employees and people, because sometimes they do have more experience in certain areas whether they’re a leader or not, so yeah. It took a bit of time but I think the way I did it was, I think, the best way I could do it because it made everybody comfortable, everybody could then see what I was doing in the business and how it was then rubbing off on everybody else and helping everybody else, so as a whole everybody was lifting, it wasn’t just me, it wasn’t just the overall business. So once I connected with them and showed them that, then they had belief in me and they had respect for me without me doing anything differently, so I think that’s what’s important as a leader.

0:37:00.9 WB: Yeah, all looks rosy towards the end and then right at the end you drop another bombshell about your eyesight and you’re slowly going blind. So how do you cope with that, how do you overcome this as you look to the future?

0:37:16.8 MB: Yeah, this is probably one of my biggest life challenges, to be honest with you. It’s been, well, it’s been there since I’ve been 27. I was 27 when I first got diagnosed with it, so it’s not like it’s something that’s just popped up, but to be honest with you I just don’t even, I try really hard not to think about it, I don’t face it, I don’t sort of accept that that’s gonna be my fate. But the reality is, yeah, it’s getting more and more difficult for me to do stuff and to read and that sort of thing. Driving is okay to a certain extent but I know my mum gave up her license and so did my uncle at the age I am now, so that’s a little bit daunting, but again I’m not going to think about it. But it’s just one of those things I guess. There’s no cure for it, they are working on some things and they have some, I don’t even know, the research has brought up some things that they do believe will help but not at the level I’m at, so maybe for my daughters if they are ever diagnosed with it, hopefully that will be the case. It’s just managing it, I guess, and I guess for me a lot of a lot of this health stuff is all about attitude as well and mindset, so I’m just hoping that I can stop it or slow it or whatever and I’m also a big believer in food for health and autoimmune diseases and a lot of that’s caused by a lot of processed and foods and things we eat.

0:38:44.5 MB: So trying to keep a really clean diet and exercise and just stay healthy and fit and yeah, there’s not much else I can do, unfortunately it’s one of those things if they do find a cure I’ll be very happy.

0:38:58.5 WB: I wish you well with that.

0:39:01.2 MB: Yeah, thank you.

0:39:01.3 WB: You have another couple of great expressions I just wanted to share which sort of wrap this up, but you say setbacks are not synonymous with failure but opportunities for growth and life is a journey that’s really a smooth linear path and I think your life epitomizes those expressions and we look at where you are today and it’s so encouraging that we as humans are so resilient. And you talk about something in the marathon that you ran that you were feeling completely depleted but yet you still managed to find more in the in the tank and I think that…

0:39:42.4 MB: Yeah.

0:39:44.4 WB: It really is a great synopsis around life and what we as humans are capable of and you’re living proof of it up there with David Goggins on my heroes list.

0:39:55.3 MB: Oh. That’s a big call, thank you. [laughter]

0:40:00.7 WB: Very good. So Marnie, any closing comments or words of wisdom that you can share with our listeners about confronting their demons and pushing through as you have throughout your life? Anything you would offer to them?

0:40:18.7 MB: I think you’ve just got to find something, you’ve just got to keep looking for something that’s going to help you to continue to move forward, whether it’s your family, whether it’s a goal, whether it’s you can find somebody that you can talk to that’s going to inspire you, but it’s just not giving up, like it doesn’t matter what you face or how hard things are, you only fail if you give up, essentially. So for me sometimes it takes time and sometimes you’ve got to wallow in that moment and there’s nothing wrong with going through that emotion ’cause I believe that it’s better than burying it, because I think burying it just causes anxiety and all sorts of other things, so there’s nothing wrong with feeling the trauma and all that sort of thing. But the main thing is that you’ve just got to remember that you can’t do it indefinitely, you’ve just got to find that strength to get up and keep moving forward and find something that’s gonna shift the energy, shift that whole momentum that you’ve got.

0:41:17.1 MB: And everyone can do it. That’s the thing, you know, people say all the time, I wish I could do what you do or I could never do that stuff or whatever, but everybody has a capacity as you said, we’ve all got it, you’ve just got to want to do it, simple as that.

0:41:32.7 WB: So Marnie, where can people follow you, connect with you, engage with you?

0:41:40.7 MB: Yeah so my socials are, just my name so Marnie Beauchamp, my website’s marniebeauchamp.com, the book you can purchase off Amazon or Barnes and Noble, depending where you are, but anywhere in the world you can get it off Amazon. Otherwise yeah, Facebook is my name, everything’s pretty much in my name, LinkedIn my name, so yeah would love to connect, absolutely, but you can also message me through my website.

0:42:10.5 WB: Okay great, we’ll put all those links in the show notes. And one last time, the title of the book?

0:42:18.1 MB: Unread Pages, The Silent Struggles Behind Every Success.

0:42:22.2 WB: Well, Marnie, thank you, it’s been an excellent conversation, I’ve really enjoyed connecting and I look forward to watching as the future unfolds for you. Well, all the best.

0:42:32.9 MB: Thank you for having me.

0:42:35.9 S2: Thank you for joining us on The ET Project, a show for executive talent development. Until next time, check out our site for free videos, ebooks, webinars and blogs at coaching4companies.com

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