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ET Project \ Podcasts

ET-045: Reaching for purpose with incremental goals while maintaining values

With Ms. Hanna Herbst

ET-045: A conversation with Hanna Herbst

and your host Wayne Brown on May 02, 2023

Episode notes: A conversation with Hanna Herbst

Today we are heading over to Zurich, Switzerland and connecting with our guest Ms. Hanna Herbst.

As Ms. Herbst says her superpower is making things happen with lots of compassion, energy, and a smile 🙂 and as you listen to our conversation today, and get to know and understand Hanna, you’ll most likely form a similar opinion.

She wears different hats in her professional life: certified leadership & career coach, management consultant, and podcast host of the show called “Reaching your Goals”, and not forgetting Hanna is also mother to a delightful 15-month old.

Another great conversation with a friend from the industry, both a fellow coach and podcaster. Really enjoyed our conversation together and some of the material we dive into.

Here is an extract from our conversation as we start to get into it…

“…I may say I like the creative things, so I like to paint and I picked up sewing. That was my hobby of the corona times. That’s why I keep my background blurred ’cause otherwise you will see my sewing machines, so that I like, and I like reading. So it’s a bunch of different things. And sports, sports is my big hobby as well…”

With that TEAM ET let’s get our conversation underway with this episode titled “Reaching for purpose with incremental goals while maintaining values.”

Today’s Guest: MS. HANNA HERBST

With more than 16 years of experience, Hanna’s background is in business (management consulting, corporate finance, entrepreneurship, and coaching. She worked in Switzerland and the US for companies such as Procter & Gamble, Siemens and Horvath before starting her own business.

Having received her MBA from NYU Stern School of Business, Hanna started a company called “Delygate” and you’ll hear us dig a little deeper on that naming during the conversation.

Through the business Hanna offers management consulting and life coaching for companies and individuals.

Hanna also lecturers on

  • Why corporate values matter more than you might think

She’s convinced that a return to values and human capital not only have an impact on interpersonal relationships, but are also financially rewarding and form the foundation for long-term corporate success.

Additionally, Hanna asks the question

  • Women in management – where are you?

As she says, everybody talks about diversity and more and more studies confirm that diversity in companies is financially beneficial: “brings more innovation,” “more sales,” and “higher profitability” so if it is so beneficial then, why are there still so few female leaders, especially in the middle management and upwards?

Final words from Hanna:

“The one thing I’d like to emphasize is I go back to the Nike commercial, just do it. If there’s something you wonder about, get started and even say if it’s going down the wrong lane, if you only went 10 steps, it’s easy to redirect. So I would encourage everybody and anybody, if there’s something top of mind and you, you’ve been put, you’ve been thinking about this for weeks and months, but you never started.

Today is the day and when you do it, tag Wayne, tag me ’cause we are here to be your accountability partners and that I would like to just reinforce, push, try it, be courageous ’cause I know you guys can do it. I have a feeling about that. And if you want to hear more from me, like just, you can always look up my podcast. It’s called Reaching your Goals.

I think it’s good fun. I have people like Wayne on so…”

0:00:03.3 Wayne Brown: Hello, I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and welcome to the ET PROJECT. We’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world, who we’re affectionately referring to as TEAM ET. Today we’re heading over to Zurich, Switzerland and we’re connecting with our guest, Ms. Hanna Herbst. Ms. Herbst says her superpower is making things happen with lots of compassion, energy, and a smile. And as you listen to our conversation today and get to know and understand Hanna, you’re most likely gonna form a similar opinion. She wears different hats in her professional life, certified leadership and career coach, management consultant and podcast host of the show called “Reaching Your Goals.” And of course not forgetting, Hanna is also mother to a delightful 15-month-old. With more than 16 years of experience, Hanna’s background is in business, management consulting, corporate finance, entrepreneurship and coaching. She worked in Switzerland and the US for companies such as Procter & Gamble, Siemens and Horvath, before starting her own business.

 

0:01:10.0 WB: Having received her MBA from NYU Stern School of Business, Hanna started a company called Delygate, and you’ll hear us dig a little deeper on that naming during the conversation. Through the business, Hanna offers management consulting and life coaching for companies and individuals. Hanna also lectures on why corporate values matter more than you might think. She’s convinced that a return to values and human capital not only have an impact on interpersonal relationships, but are also financially rewarding and form the foundation for long-term corporate success. Additionally, Hanna asks the question, women in management, where are you? As she says, everybody talks about diversity. And more and more studies confirm that diversity in companies is financially beneficial. It brings more innovation, more sales, and higher profitability. So if it’s so beneficial, then why are there still so few female leaders, especially in middle management and upwards? With that TEAM ET, let’s get our conversation underway with this episode titled, “Reaching for Purpose With Incremental Goals While Maintaining Values.”

0:02:21.4 Speaker 2: Welcome to the ET PROJECT, a podcast for those executive talents determined to release their true potential and create an impact. Join our veteran coach and mentor Wayne Brown as we unpack an exciting future together.

0:02:38.4 WB: All right. Well, welcome TEAM ET. We have another fantastic week. It’s going so quickly. The year is almost half over. I can’t believe that, but today we’re blessed once again with another fantastic guest. This time we’re, as you probably heard in my intro, we’re traveling all the way to Switzerland to Zurich, wonderful city, a beautiful location part of the world. We’re going to be talking with a lady by the name of Hanna Herbst, and I’ve pronounced it in my Australian accent, so I’ll let Hanna correct that later. But Hanna, welcome to the ET PROJECT. It’s really great to have you on board.

0:03:16.1 Hanna Herbst: Hi, Wayne. It’s so nice to see you again. How are you doing today?

0:03:20.0 WB: Fantastic. So for anyone that follows me, you may have seen that I was once a guest on Hanna’s podcast. So we’re gonna talk a little bit about Hanna’s podcast later on in the episode. I’m great, Hanna. Very busy. We were just talking before, we hit record, and I know you’re also very busy and I only learned today that you’re a 15 month old mom. Instead of being, having a 15 year old baby, you’re a 15 month old mom. So congratulations.

0:03:50.3 HH: Yes, thank you so much.

0:03:52.3 WB: How are you coping with the workload and being a fairly new mother, how is it all working out?

0:03:58.6 HH: It’s actually working out quite well. And I think what works for me is that the work I’m doing is really in line with my purpose. So I find it inspirational. So also over the past number of years, I spent so much time thinking about what do I want to do? What is in line with my own values, my purpose? So now I do coaching, consulting, and the podcasting is still relatively new and I’ve really enjoyed, so I get so much energy out of it and that really helps. So by the end of the day when I’m only mom, then it’s still so much fun and then I still have time to have fun with the little one. And now he, like a number, now he’s really walking, walking faster and it’s so fun to see and he can say “No.” He’s fun.

0:04:45.7 WB: You’re Swiss, so what language is your son speaking? I’m guessing not too many words, but which which language does he speak?

0:04:55.2 HH: German. Then I also make sure that he listens to English, ’cause I would like him to really pick up English as we go. And I’m Swiss and I also have a German passport. So I’m originally from Germany, so I’m both.

0:05:08.9 WB: Oh, really? So you’re…

0:05:12.0 HH: You didn’t know.

[chuckle]

0:05:14.0 WB: Well, I spent a lot of my later part of my career working for a German company and I spent a lot of time in Germany. And I had the opportunity to go to Zurich and travel around Switzerland. Prior to the company I worked for in Germany, I worked for a company in Switzerland. And prior to that for a company in Finland. So I have a very strong European heritage.

0:05:42.3 HH: I know, and I remember you’ve worked in nearly 90 cities, so that number is still striking.

0:05:48.8 WB: Yes. I have the gray hair that… as a result. So what’s happening in your world? Any fun facts that you’d like to share with our audience?

0:06:00.6 HH: Yeah, yeah. There is no fun. Do you see my serious face here?

[laughter]

0:06:05.5 WB: It’s terrible. Life is terrible.

0:06:07.4 HH: I mean, fun fact, I ordered a new bicycle and I can pick it up later today or maybe I do it on Monday depending on my schedule. So I’m excited for that. And then, ’cause you know, it’s like here, at least here in Switzerland, you can go everywhere by bicycle and that’s quite fun. So I’m excited for that.

0:06:23.8 WB: I was secretly hoping that you might say in my spare time I yodel or in spare time I play, what’s that big long horn thing that the highland people…

0:06:37.0 HH: I mean, in German I think it’s called the alpenhorn.

0:06:39.6 WB: That’s it.

0:06:40.5 HH: But in English, I have no idea.

0:06:43.7 WB: Yeah. I was hoping you might have some sort of pass time like that.

0:06:48.8 HH: I may say I like the creative things, so I like to paint and I picked up sewing. That was my hobby of the corona times. That’s why I keep my background blurred ’cause otherwise you will see my sewing machines, so that I like, and I like reading. So it’s a bunch of different things. And sports, sports is my big hobby as well.

0:07:07.4 WB: What type of Sports?

0:07:08.4 HH: Those are the things I really enjoy. I go running, so that’s probably, running is my number one. I try to go swimming once a week ’cause I think swimming laps is just super healthy and I find it really meditational. Much more meditational than running ’cause when I swim I cannot drift with my thoughts, I really stay in the pool and when I go running I can be anywhere and everywhere. And I used to do also more yoga. Right now not as much, but eventually I will pick it up again. So those are my sports and I need it, otherwise I have too much energy.

0:07:40.4 WB: And it sounds like cycling is about to be added to the list.

0:07:43.8 HH: Yeah, but it is like my… I also have a bicycle now ’cause it’s just crap now. But I’m really usually just using it to get from A to B.

0:07:50.8 WB: Right.

0:07:52.7 HH: That’s why I see it more as a functional thing instead of taking the tram or the train locally. So I can do everything with that. I have, how do you call those attachments that you add to your bicycle so that the little one can also ride with you. So I will be…

0:08:05.9 WB: Oh okay, so you’re really going to fill that stereotypical mum image that I have of women in Germany, riding on the bike with a child on the back? [laughter]

0:08:17.0 HH: Pretty much.

0:08:18.1 WB: So anything in your world that’s really got you excited at the moment apart from your young son and your activities?

0:08:25.0 HH: It’s actually the podcast ’cause I started the podcast, it’s called “Reaching Your Goals” in January this year. And I got, what I really enjoy about it is getting to know other people and partially it’s very randomly. It’s like that’s how I met you and you are based in China, originally from Australia, so far away. And we spoke, great connection, and that is just something that I find so inspiring and I’m learning so much.

0:08:54.5 WB: Right.

0:08:55.0 HH: I know we spoke about that. And you have the interview, you edit it, you listen to it again and there’s so much new knowledge that I’m really, really excited about.

0:09:06.0 WB: Yeah, I heard that you studied at NYU Stern School of Business.

0:09:12.7 HH: Yes.

0:09:14.1 WB: Congratulations. Very nice.

0:09:15.4 HH: Thank you.

0:09:17.6 WB: Did you travel over there or did you do it virtually?

0:09:19.3 WB: Neither. I actually, when I was still in Germany I did my first degree with Siemens. I was on a scholarship program with them and then I transferred with Siemens to the US. So I was working initially in Connecticut and then later New York, but I was always based in New York and while I was there I was like, “I should get another degree.” And NYU they have, they also offer the MBA program and the part-time program. So I was working full-time with Siemens and in the evening or on weekends I was studying and getting my MBA. So it was very busy. That was probably the busiest time in my life. ‘Cause that was partially insane, but I loved it.

0:10:00.6 WB: And the experience overall was incredible, I’m guessing.

0:10:04.5 HH: Yes. So it is, if you ask me what I’m really proud of, NYU and getting my MBA there is top of the list. And I think it’ll always be ’cause it meant so much to me.

0:10:16.3 WB: Yeah. So let’s dive a little bit into your career. As you said, you’ve worked over in the US, you worked with Siemens, I think you worked for Procter & Gamble at one stage, et cetera. What did you start doing and when did you get into the corporate space? What were you doing at the beginning?

0:10:35.9 HH: My first job that was then with Siemens back in the US. I was a financial analyst in corporate procurement and we were within, the world was cool. It’s like we were within Siemens, one of the first groups that were doing auctions for a selling within procurement to really push price. We were doing auctioning. That was super interesting. It’s a little bit mean towards the buyers, if you really push, but we did that and from there eventually I left the US and then I ended up in Procter & Gamble. And there I stayed within finance, but I was first working in healthcare, then I went to haircare, I went to baby care and within Procter & Gamble you rotate your finance job. So I was doing, finance for new products. I did global planning, I did the… What do we call it? It’s like I did the finance support, what are the promotions. How do we go in the market. So a lot of those things within Procter & Gamble.

0:11:40.4 HH: Yes. And within Procter you also were supposed to do projects to really show that you’re committed so that you get promoted. And I enjoy projects and I was like, “Ooh, I have the MBA, I like projects, let me go into consulting.” And first I was living in Geneva and then with the consulting I was like, “Oh, that’s a nice time to move to Zurich.” So I moved to… I accepted a job for management consulting here in Zurich. Moved here and started doing projects within finance, corporate finance, and did that for a few years. And I was like, “I think there are more topics out there than finance.” So, I changed companies, did projects for innovation to really change my own or get to know more different topics and enjoyed that.

0:12:27.6 HH: The thing was, we then also, or in that job I was started working with startups and I was like, “Whoa, startups, that’s fun.” So I figured I should found a startup. I did that for a few years. It didn’t fly, it was an online marketplace. So I learned again, tremendous amount, didn’t fly, corona buried it. And then I went back into project work, consulting and I added the coaching, to my portfolio. So I became a certified coach. And now I do that. It’s like some days I do project work, the other days I do coaching.

0:13:04.4 WB: Was there ever like a morning that you woke up and said, “The corporate world just, it’s great but it’s not enough. I want to do something different.” Was there a transition point like that or it was more subtle?

0:13:21.5 HH: There was. It’s like I did a long term project still within finance, and I found myself thinking like, “Oh, this is partially a waste of my time.” That was really the thought I had. And then I ordered books that were about happiness, how to find your happiness, finding your happiness within the corporate space. So I started reading about that and that then triggered me to go into innovation ’cause there was really this thought there should be more. I’m not enjoying it enough. Or maybe I learned everything I wanted to learn so it’s time to move on. I go and buy books and I read.

0:14:00.9 WB: So when you talk about innovation, is that something that you bring into your work or is just a personal trait that you have that you get curious and you like to become innovative, creative in doing different things? Or is it something you bring and marry into the work as well?

0:14:15.0 HH: I think it’s there. I think it’s deeply ingrained. Probably that’s why I also like the creative things like I like to create, I guess that’s really part of me. That’s why I like painting. And I did pottery for many years. Actually not right now, so the whole creating process. Also working with my fingers to some degree is something I enjoy so much. And so creating is for sure there and innovation, getting curious. Yeah. Or for example, I give you a very simple example and I think we also spoke about it before. Well, the podcasting, editing is a huge part of the whole thing. So I tried out now the AI, how can you use it? Do I think it’s good? But there is always curiosity to learn.

0:15:05.0 WB: I think the beauty about what we do is if we have that mindset, that open growth mindset, the world is such an oyster or an untapped resource that you never tire of. Right?

0:15:20.2 HH: Yes. And the other thing I enjoy is when you’re curious, I don’t know yet what will be in five years time. Will I still do the same jobs with the same percentage split? I have no idea. And I find that exciting that I just don’t know yet.

0:15:35.1 WB: That’s an interesting transition point, and I’m gonna use that segue. Thank you.

[laughter]

0:15:43.3 HH: You’re welcome.

0:15:44.8 WB: Because listening to you say that, I know that you also are very strong on things like value, on your purpose, on setting goals that drive you in that direction. So based on that freedom to think about, you’re not sure what’s coming, but you also like to know what your purpose is. Where do you sit, like you have this North Star?

0:16:13.0 HH: Yeah. So in terms of purpose, I always say for me it’s making things happen with lots of energy, compassion, and a smile. So for me, it’s really about helping other people and myself, just doing things. And that I’ve been doing for a number of years. I don’t know yet if in five years time will I do more project work to really help companies to drive their projects and get things done? Will I do more coaching and help more individuals? I don’t know. But I know for sure that in terms of my goal, making things happen, that will stay with me. ‘Cause if it doesn’t stay with me, I will be unhappy. And when I talk about goals I link it very tightly to purpose. So thank you for bringing that up, ’cause the number one step, I feel we always need to ask ourselves if we have a goal, is that goal linked to my North Star, to my purpose, to my why? ‘Cause it will be a shame to put in so much energy and effort and then going down the wrong direction. That would be just a shame.

0:17:17.8 WB: Absolutely. I also, so when I facilitate and develop leadership programs I also put energy into making sure there’s an alignment between values. And I know you talk, I believe, on corporate values and making sure there’s an alignment between what they say the value is and what the real world shows up as the values.

0:17:46.1 HH: Yes. Yes.

0:17:46.9 WB: How do you bring the value side of things into the coaching with your clients?

0:17:51.9 HH: When I start a new coaching relationship we will look into the purpose of my clients, and also what are the core values ’cause those two things are the basis for anything and everything. We need to have the purpose to make sure the person is going down the right career lane and for that part. And we need to have the right values, or we need to understand what are the core values, ’cause otherwise, if we do things that are not in line with our own values, we will get maybe potentially even depressed. Like it has an impact on us. And say if I’m a team player, and that is maybe a simple example. It’s like if team playing is my number one core value it’s like I need to have this interaction with other the people jointly we reach, and then I end up in a company where it’s just about individuals and you are really fighting against each other.

0:18:43.0 HH: I won’t survive, ’cause that is so against me. That I’m like holy moly, no. And somebody else might be thriving in that environment. So that’s why to me that is really the basis ’cause it helps. And I need to make sure that my activities are in line with my values. ‘Cause if they are, everything else is falling in line and also confidence is always a topic that people bring up. Like how do I become more confident?

0:19:14.1 HH: You can use your values as your own compass to really drive your activities. So knowing your values, it also helps you to become more confident ’cause if you live in your values, confidence will come and you won’t question yourself. So that is the beauty about it. So it’s super simple when you just put it like this, but it’s also challenging if you want, I can give you an example to really show where it’s becoming challenging.

0:19:43.9 WB: Please.

0:19:46.9 HH: For example, assume your number one goal or your number one value is health. And you say, my health means from now on, I work out a few times a week. I only eat healthy food. I don’t drink alcohol, I don’t smoke, I sleep enough. And in the beginning, family, friends they, will be like, hey, sounds really great. But then they ask you to go and eat burgers and you’re like, hmm. Burgers are not from me. They’re like, let’s go for a drink. You’re like, I only drink water. And they’re like, you’re boring. You want to go home at 10:00. Come on, don’t be like this. You can’t sleep when you are dead. Eating meat once won’t hurt you. So there will be pushback. And that is then the hard part to really this like… ‘Cause then we know that in adults, they will come up. They will be like, hey, if I follow those values, it’s great, but then I’m alone ’cause they don’t like to play with me anymore.

0:20:40.9 WB: Yep.

0:20:41.3 HH: And that’s when it’s really becoming hard. What do you do?

0:20:45.8 WB: Mm-hmm.

0:20:46.1 HH: And that is just a relatively simple example just to show that following your values, it also, it takes guts, it takes courage.

0:20:53.6 WB: Takes courage.

0:20:54.7 HH: And sometimes it also means that the people you spend time with might not be the best choice.

0:21:03.3 WB: Do you differentiate between personal and career values?

0:21:06.6 HH: No. I feel I bring… I’m always the same person. So I don’t, no. I bring myself to whatever I do. And that’s… I think it’s like if we were going to meet in person, like when you come to Switzerland, you look me up, we go for coffee, you will get this. If we end up doing, say a coaching program together, still the same person. So it makes it easier for me.

0:21:34.0 WB: I’m on board with you 100%. What about things such as vision? Do you focus at all on vision as part of this clustering?

0:21:45.8 HH: I know that manifestation and visioning is supposedly very powerful. If I can see where I want to go, is more likely that I actually will. ‘Cause I’ve already gone that way. So I don’t do it very regularly. So that is something, sometimes it’s crossing my mind. Maybe I should be doing it more. Doing manifestations. The visioning, I do it. So I tell you this, when I really have some spare time, I’m sitting on a train, I mind wandering, I close my eyes. Where do I want to go? What do I want to achieve? So in those moments, I really take a step back and think about that. I’m not doing it enough, but I know that it can be powerful. At least that’s what I’m reading. What’s your experience in that? Do you find it powerful?

0:22:36.1 WB: Yeah, I like to have all three as part of my own practice. I like to have the vision. It’s different to the purpose of course. And then make sure that my values align with those two. But I’m always driving towards purpose. That’s the primary objective. That’s where we’re heading. But, what is it we want to see when we get there type of thing. That’s the vision. Yeah.

0:23:05.3 HH: Yes.

0:23:07.1 WB: I think it’s an interesting topic. So the goal side, you then, once you have your purpose and your values, I guess then you are really establishing the goals that are going to be driving you in that correct direction? Is that how…

0:23:25.9 HH: Yes.

0:23:26.4 WB: How you approach it?

0:23:27.2 HH: Yes. And then the next thing is, so now we… As you say, we know exactly what we want to achieve. We know it’s in line with our purpose. So it’s something that would be say, going down the right direction. And then the first step is really the planning. How do I get there? And what I like to do is, I look at the whole journey and then I break it down in smaller steps.

0:23:50.7 HH: ‘Cause I know it’s like… If I tell you climb up the whole mountain, you will be like, holy moly, that’s very high. If you break it up in smaller, it helps, it’s much easier to get there. So we break it up and I have a planning background. I’m planning by nature. So I break it up and it’s also about, it’s like how do I break it up, by when do I need to achieve this? ‘Cause I also want to make it measurable ’cause otherwise am I on track? Am I off track? I think that is important to understand. So break it down in smaller steps, know by when you want to achieve it. And then you can ask the question, what do I need to get there? ‘Cause maybe if it’s like the first step, maybe I still need to prepare my lunch and make a drink. So what do I need to get there?

0:24:35.8 WB: Yep.

0:24:36.2 HH: And to have all the ingredients. And then you go. And there’s also one important thing about the going, like there’s this notation about from being in motion to being in action. And the first step is the hardest. But there are also coaching clients. I push them to really do the first step. There’s not much you can do wrong, but when you do it, you will be incredibly proud of yourself that you dared that you are courageous. Because the inner noise is getting loud when change is becoming a reality. So really pushing to get started to get to the first really is like when you look at the height, the first 20, 30 meters higher to the first it up.

0:25:20.8 WB: Yeah.

0:25:22.6 HH: So…

0:25:22.7 WB: And that’s where coaching is so valuable is by experience. So when you try and do this by yourself, of course, depending on you as an individual and how driven you are, this may or may not be successful. With coaching of course the coach is always there beside you. The coach is supporting, guiding, encouraging, and that’s really where I see a huge value coming outta coaching. How are you finding this transition yourself into coaching? I know you did your coaching certification through Co-Active. So again, congratulations it’s a very nice organization. How are you finding this transition?

0:26:07.2 HH: I love it. I love it. I mean, before I used to work or, I mean, I still do project work, so there is always like this bigger team. So, and with the coaching is this one-on-one interaction to really understand how can I support this one person border, those topics. I find that very intriguing. And also what you were just saying, the value of coaching is also like this pushing and really understanding what is outside of the comfort zone of the particular person. So how can we make sure the person is doing the first step and we are with them, sometimes we are holding hands like very tightly, sometimes a little bit more loosely, whatever the person needs. And what I also liked with the coaching in between, there’s homework. So, and then they, I ask them, oh, send me a message when you did it. Like, no more details, just tell me. So also putting on a little bit of pressure to really make sure people go. And when I then get a sense on the next time they’re telling me about it and they are so proud. They’re like, “Hey, I dared, I was courageous.” That’s when I get goosebumps and I’m like, oh, this is fantastic. I love it. And I think I do it for that feeling.

0:27:22.5 WB: Right, playing the role of the accountability partner is potentially very powerful. Particularly as a coach, as part of our programs, we always suggest that they find an accountability partner if they’re not going to use their coach because it does add something to the whole mix. It helps keep their momentum going and their interest, engagement, etcetera. So I have a question about your company’s name now it’s called Delygate, so I’m sure there’s a story behind the the name.

0:28:00.2 HH: Yes. I actually, yes, I told you that years ago I did a startup. So the startup, so that’s where actually the name is coming from spoiler alert. So the startup was a like an online platform to help, to help you to delegate everyday tasks, whatever it is. Like in the US they have a TaskRabbit, pretty much same thing here for the Swiss market. And ’cause there it’s all about delegation. So I wanted to have a play on words about delegation and that’s how I found Delygate.

0:28:30.3 WB: Very good.

0:28:30.8 HH: Yeah. And ’cause I still had the company name, the company by itself. So I figured, you know what, somehow it’s also still fitting is, it’s the, that’s where it’s coming from.

0:28:42.6 WB: So where do you see your own organization, your own business and yourself moving in the years to come like are you planning to now focus more heavily on the consulting and the coaching, and move in that direction? Or what do you see as your future?

0:29:01.4 HH: I did a number of corporate findings also last year and earlier this year. So that was all about like, say building trust or teamwork, whatever companies need. And I think that is something I would also like to develop more. ‘Cause, so I would like to go more on the coaching on the software side ’cause the human factor is so important and I have a feeling that companies, value that more these days, ’cause there is a shortage in people. So you need to really, as a company, be attractive to keep your people and to attract them. So offering that and making sure you get the maximum out of your employees, I feel is one of the key challenges companies face. And I think that’s something where I can add more value. So I would like to focus more into that direction.

0:29:51.5 WB: I’m always conscious of the time and we’re coming towards the end, but if we, think about things we’ve spoken about so far, is there anything we haven’t touched that you would really love to share with our listeners about the direction you are going? Purpose, vision, [chuckle], values, goal setting, anything at all that you would like to share more on?

0:30:16.5 HH: The one thing I’d like to emphasize is I go back to the Nike commercial, just do it. If there’s something you wonder about, get started and even say if it’s going down the wrong lane, if you only went 10 steps, it’s easy to redirect. So I would encourage everybody and anybody, if there’s something top of mind and you, you’ve been put, you’ve been thinking about this for weeks and months, but you never started. Today is the day and when you do it, tag Wayne, tag me ’cause we are here to be your accountability partners and that I would like to just reinforce, push, try it, be courageous ’cause I know you guys can do it. I have a feeling about that. And if you want to hear more from me, like just, you can always look up my podcast. It’s called Reaching your Goals. I think it’s good fun. I have people like Wayne on so…

0:31:14.8 WB: Very nice.

0:31:15.1 HH: And I’m also happy to help in terms of coaching.

0:31:18.4 WB: In addition to the podcast, where else can people find you?

0:31:22.5 HH: The best place is probably really my website is like, www.delygate.com ’cause there I have information on the podcast, the coaching consulting. So that’s where I keep everything together. Otherwise, I’m actually only really active on LinkedIn. I mean, I also have Instagram, so there you would find it at @delygate or @reachingyourgoalspodcast. But main space for me, where I’m a little bit active is on LinkedIn.

0:31:48.1 WB: Okay. We’ll make sure we put that in the show notes so people can find it.

0:31:53.7 HH: Thank you so much.

0:31:53.9 WB: Yeah. And what are you working on at the moment? Is there anything that you are working on? Or you got any books coming, any more, extension to the family coming? What’s your focus at the moment? Be it business or in your private life?

0:32:11.2 HH: I mean, focus right now is getting more of the podcast episodes out and everything edited really. Not always run behind. So that is my personal goal these days ’cause I publish on Tuesdays and sometimes I found myself to finish up the episode on Monday. I’m like, okay, this is not the best way to do it. So now I’m, you know, I’m, right now my goal is to get ahead of my own game.

[laughter]

0:32:37.2 WB: It’s a case of, practice, practice and practice, and you’ll eventually find the groove and such. You’ll find the process that works best for you I guess, but, fantastic.

0:32:49.2 HH: The thing is, I tell everybody go ahead and do things. So I always do things. So that’s why I’m really busy. [laughter]

0:32:58.2 WB: Yeah Well Hanna it’s always great to connect and I really, look forward to watching and following your journey as you become, more entrenched in the podcast world and you become more entrenched in coaching and consulting. So I think you’re on a really important journey, but also a very exciting one. I look forward to watching…

0:33:22.2 HH: Thank you.

0:33:22.9 WB: How that all pans out. And I really encourage our listeners to connect with you, and see what you can do for them because you definitely have a lot to offer. So thank you for being able to…

0:33:35.0 HH: Thank you so much, Wayne.

0:33:35.6 WB: Yeah, my pleasure. And thank you for being on The ET PROJECT. Been great having you as a guest.

0:33:39.6 HH: And thank you so much for inviting me. That was really so much fun. I really, really appreciate it. And I’m also curious to see how your show and everything will develop. So good luck to you and we will stay in touch.

0:33:52.3 WB: Yeah, thank you.

0:33:54.8 Speaker 2: Thank you for joining us on the ET PROJECT, A show for Executive Talent Development. Until next time, check out our site for free videos, eBooks, webinars and blogs at coachingforcompanies.com.

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