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ET Project \ Podcasts

ET-099: Profitability Secrets Exposed: Building a Foundation for Long-Term Success

With Ms. Erin Andrea Craske

ET-099: A conversation with Erin Andrea Craske

and your host Wayne Brown on April 30, 2024

Episode notes: A conversation with Erin Andrea Craske

Hello and welcome to the ET Project. I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and as usual, we’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET.

Today we’re in London to chat with our guest, Ms. Erin Andrea Craske. Ms. Craske is an award-winning strategist with a 20-year career culminating as global head of consumer brands.

With expertise in strategic development, profitability, leadership and communication, she’s an ICF-certified business and leadership success coach.

Here is an extract from our conversation as we start to get into it…

I fell in love with existentialism when I was in school, because I was in a French language school and we were reading Camus when I was like 14 years old. So, really pretty early. And it was something about Le Mythe De Sisyphe. Whatever the myth, the English pronunciation, of Sisyphus, Sisyphe it’s actually resonated with me all this misunderstanding of the world around and through rebellion. And that’s something I remember. I probably didn’t even get the meaning at that age, but I kind of felt that that’s something that’s really sits strongly with me. So, this is all I knew about philosophy, and then suddenly it came from nowhere.

So, obviously my love for existentialism, I brought through all my life. So, it’s still something that I use in my daily life and my coaching philosophy.

Today’s Guest: ERIN ANDREA CRASKE

Leveraging 16 years of leadership, she empowers contribution-driven businesses to succeed on their terms and build a profitable business while amplifying a ripple effect of goodness. There are literally so many wonderful things I could share about Erin and the work she’s doing starting with the great book that she’s written called From Profit to Purpose.

It’s the alchemy, if you like, the A-Z, a practical strategy guide that encompasses insights on building self-selling brands, achieving business longevity, thriving in a saturated markets, and avoiding strategic pitfalls. Or to her philosophical side, even though Erin denies that she has one, with quotes such as the following two examples, “the greatest gift you can give yourself is the commitment to personal growth.

By striving to become better, you’ll discover that the possibilities are endless and embrace hiring those better than yourself. Their skills and motivation fuel business growth.”

“True greatness is in building an inspiring team, not in self admiration.” And Team, I’m literally scratching the surface. You’ll also hear me ask the question about Erin’s insane yet enviable lifelong learning habits, which make mine look amateurish at best.

Team ET, you’re truly in for a treat from this fascinating and highly intellectual individual. So, please ready yourself for an exciting conversation as we explore the possibility flow framework, its foundations, and the six pillars.

For podcast listeners, Erin is generously offering

  • A gift of two full coaching sessions to the listeners
  • A 50% discount on the strategy guide – all-in-one marketing toolbox – using EFFORTLESS code at the TGBBS checkout
  • Freebies: business surveys, marketing frameworks, quotes, and strategy guide materials

To claim the above gifts, email Erin and mention that you heard this conversation on the ET project podcast – effortless@erinandreacraske.com

Final words from Erin:

One of the things that I keep on thinking and why I believe in my coaching methodology, although it may sound scary to some people, we are much better human beings than we think we are. We are so often afraid of retrospection because we believe we discover something that we don’t like about ourselves. So, here is the truth, and I swear by it, whatever we don’t like about ourselves, it is not who we are. This is who we believe we are through conditioning.

Through adversary events and through not knowing how to process these adverse events in our lives. This is what we need to pass by to get to who we are because underneath we all are created this way. When we were born as babies, we’re all exactly the same, right? We’re pure. So, when you take off this layer of whatever shaped you and you believe that this is you, it is not.

So, you will come to purity. And from the place of purity, trust me, relationships are much better. The way how you handle life and adverse events is much better. Leadership comes naturally because you will stop thinking about yourself. You will start thinking about others and your business, and you will be leading from a totally different place. That is something that next time when we don’t feel good about ourselves, remember, this person you don’t feel good about is not who you are. You are much better. And let it just sit with you so you next time it makes you feel a little bit that there is a little bit of a light in the end of the tunnel. And yes, it is…

[music]

0:00:06.4 Wayne Brown: Hello, I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and welcome to the ET Project. We’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world, whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET. Today we’re in London to chat with our guest, Ms. Erin Andrea Craske. Ms. Craske is an award-winning strategist with a 20-year career culminating as global head of consumer brands. With expertise in strategic development, profitability, leadership and communication, she’s an ICF-certified business and leadership success coach.

0:00:40.0 WB: Leveraging 16 years of leadership, she empowers contribution-driven businesses to succeed on their terms and build a profitable business while amplifying a ripple effect of goodness. There are literally so many wonderful things I could share about Erin and the work she’s doing starting with the great book that she’s written called From Profit to Purpose. It’s the alchemy, if you like, the A-Z, a practical strategy guide that encompasses insights on building self-selling brands, achieving business longevity, thriving in a saturated markets, and avoiding strategic pitfalls. Or to her philosophical side, even though Erin denies that she has one, with quotes such as the following two examples, “the greatest gift you can give yourself is the commitment to personal growth. By striving to become better, you’ll discover that the possibilities are endless and embrace hiring those better than yourself. Their skills and motivation fuel business growth.”

0:01:42.0 WB: “True greatness is in building an inspiring team, not in self admiration.” And Team, I’m literally scratching the surface. You’ll also hear me ask the question about Erin’s insane yet enviable lifelong learning habits, which make mine look amateurish at best. Team ET, you’re truly in for a treat from this fascinating and highly intellectual individual. So, please ready yourself for an exciting conversation as we explore the possibility flow framework, its foundations, and the six pillars.

[music]

0:02:17.7 Speaker 2: Welcome to the ET Project, a podcast for those executive talents determined to release their true potential and create an impact. Join our veteran coach and mentor, Wayne Brown, as we unpack an exciting future together.

0:02:34.0 WB: Good morning. Hello. Good afternoon, wherever you might be. Team ET, welcome to this, what is the last day of April 2024 and another episode of the ET Project. We’re going to be speaking with the founder of Effortless, Ms. Erin Andrea Craske. Bear with me while I read something to you. Follow your dreams and find your meaning. There’s no need to settle for the status quo, question, disrupt. You don’t need to be bad to be different. You don’t need to destroy to be free. Expand your knowledge, better yourself. Create your life, grow your business. Make it effortless. Erin, that’s quite a beautiful statement. It’s part of your effortlessness philosophy. Welcome to the show, first of all.

0:03:22.3 Erin Andrea Craske: Oh, dear God. It was so unexpected. Thank you. The first time I hear it said aloud. Thank you so much for that. I liked it myself, and thank you for inviting me and welcoming me here.

0:03:38.5 WB: That’s my pleasure.

0:03:39.2 EC: That was totally, It was unexpected. That was the beginning of the day. Yay!

[chuckle]

0:03:45.1 WB: When I was doing a little bit of reading about you and the material that you’ve written, it really stands out to me that you have a very strong philosophical side to you. Many of the quotes, and you have a huge number of quotes I’ve identified. They’re deep and incredibly meaningful. Where does that side stem from?

0:04:07.6 EC: I have no idea. Honestly, because when I was in university, we used to have philosophy because I graduated in art. So, philosophy was part of our course. And I’ve never been interested because I found it to be too theoretical. And I’m quite practical in my mind and approach to life. So, I’m really rational, logical, and all that is abstract. My mind doesn’t grasp it.

0:04:40.8 EC: I can’t follow it. Simply physiologically it doesn’t work for me. And this is how I was perceiving philosophy, that it is very abstract, apart from one. I fell in love with existentialism when I was in school, because I was in a French language school and we were reading Camus when I was like 15, 14 years old. So, really pretty early. And it was something about Le Mythe De Sisyphe. Whatever the myth, the English pronunciation, of Sisyphus, Sisyphe it’s actually resonated with me all this misunderstanding of the world around and through rebellion. And that’s something I remember. I probably didn’t even get the meaning at that age, but I kind of felt that that’s something that’s really sits strongly with me. So, this is how it’s all. All I knew about philosophy, and then suddenly it came from nowhere.

0:05:44.4 EC: So, obviously my love for existentialism, I brought through all my life. So, it’s still something that I use in my daily life and my coaching philosophy. Humanism, I discovered a couple of years ago, and there were a few things that, again, resonated with me deeply, and that is very. How can I say? It’s not a really good topic to discuss on a podcast because it’s controversial and I may put myself in a hot water, but I will probably mention it anyway. I didn’t know that humanists, how they approve the assisted dying because… Assisted death because they believe that it’s a freedom of choice. It’s a right of every individual to go or not to go this direction.

0:06:38.9 EC: I was shocked to hear somebody stating it so clearly, right? And standing by that. I was like, “Oh, there’s something I need to know more about humanism.” This is how I discovered humanism. And there were so many things that they say about the freedom of being individual or freedom to self-actualize the freedom to stand by yourself for yourself. All the things that actually I came from existentialism that I felt like it’s like the next step logically because you rebel first to find meaning, to find yourself, to find the meaning of this world, people around you. And then when you find it, you are in a position to be yourself, celebrate yourself and self-actualize as yourself.

0:07:31.7 WB: Right.

0:07:31.8 EC: Right. So, that was like a logical continuation. And Buddhism and Daoism, they came to me when I was in challenging situations in my life. First, was Buddhism that I helped me. I helped me first time around. And this is now why I went deep to the philosophy. And Daoism was the second time around when I was in a challenging situation. And it helped me to say survive or get through this period.

0:08:03.5 EC: Because they helped me, I thought, you know what? It may actually help others. There’s something about that that made me feel so much better in this life. I feel so much better about myself and made it so much easier on a daily basis. So, this is how I adopted those and all the quotes, sometimes there’s something powerful just in few words that you can’t say better. And when I want to express the meaning of what it means to me, what I’m talking about, sometimes just taking powerful quote is the best solution. People don’t have to read all the blah, blah, blah that I wrote because it’s not for everybody, but I just couldn’t make it shorter, honestly. But they can just read the quote and get the meaning of what what’s about.

0:08:57.1 WB: Yeah. I think it’s wonderful. I mean, there’s so much richness in the messages that you are giving. We’ll come back to the book and we’ll go deeper into that later. But, yeah, I was really intrigued just to have a little bit of a understanding about that background. What I would like to do before we jump too deep into the conversation, if that’s okay, is ask if you could share a little bit about your career. It’s such an impressive career and I’m sure everyone would love to know more about it. And what was it?

0:09:31.1 EC: I got so much praise in one episode.

[laughter]

0:09:33.5 EC: You know.

[laughter]

0:09:35.0 WB: Well, maybe the shortened version.

[laughter]

0:09:41.2 EC: No, I guess actually about my career, there was nothing particularly interesting to talk about because I didn’t choose… Oh, sometimes people start, in my childhood, I wanted to be this and that, and I was… I didn’t want to be anything and I didn’t dream about anything. All I knew I don’t wanna study math and I don’t wanna learn science. So, that actually left me with arts. And then, from the French school, it was linguistic University. And from that was the first job that I landed was with L’Oreal. So, that how my career started and I didn’t know much about it, to be honest. It just, after two or three years in L’Oreal, I realized that what interests me the most is the brand marketing. And this is how I started consciously moving from where I was in L’Oreal, into the companies where I believed brand marketing is strong. And this appeared to be British American Tobacco, the best, absolutely the best brand marketing school ever, regardless what people say, because it was a long time ago. And that time we were the best.

0:10:45.9 WB: Yes.

0:10:46.7 EC: And what I loved about it, actually it tapped into my passions. So, the first one is art and creativity. And I do believe that as a brand strategist, you have to be creative and you have to be artistic for different purposes. And the second thing, as a brand strategist, you have to be psychologist. So, if you are not psychologist, you have to be empathetic. It’s either or, but you need to understand human nature. You need to love understanding human nature because it’s the only way you can create a powerful strategy. Nothing to do with numbers. You need to know the basis, right? It’s like everywhere, the foundation, the foundational knowledge of what brand marketing or marketing is about. But for the rest, you just mirror your customer. You know that better than you know yourself and you mirror. And from this place you can work in any industry. But it’s so interesting because brand marketing stops being a business discipline. It becomes science. It becomes psychology.

0:10:50.3 EC: And I loved it. And that’s what actually helped me to progress simply because it just resonated with me so much. And the second part of career, almost as you’re progressing, is leadership. And that was a bit more complicated, I have to say, because I was trained to be transformational leader. By nature, I was more authentic leader. Again, as a rebel it’s like whatever. I did my way, so I’m who I am. And it just lands nicely when you’re rebel to be authentic. It just goes hand in hand. And something that wasn’t welcome in corporate environment. So, I kind of was merging both styles as I was pleased a little bit from here, a little bit from the edge, I was to create something uniquely mine. But, first of all, I became leader too early. And, I guess, sometimes it plays against you because you need to have certain level of maturity and wisdom to work with individuals and to get the best out of individuals.

0:12:52.8 EC: And another thing is that my care for individuals wasn’t really welcome very much or care for anything like customers or brands because it’s what wasn’t what was driving your career. So, there was a potential clash and yeah. And when you’re clashing with authority that you don’t accept for just because they kind of make no sense to you and you don’t respect them, and you don’t believe that authority as a position means that you need to accept it, it doesn’t. It doesn’t even mean that the person in the position and of authority deserves to be in this position.

0:13:36.0 EC: That is something I learned when I was really young, that, somebody who has a title of a director was a school director, and the lady was corrupt. She had nothing to do with integrity of her position. I was supposed to be working with children. And when I was 15, I realized that, no, even if you’re director doesn’t mean that you deserve being one. And it’s like, so, yeah. So, you kind of, with time you become corporate misfit. You stop enjoying what you’re doing regardless of your love for brand psychology and people and growing teams altogether. The dissatisfaction takes its toll and, yeah. And I guess it’s ends your career prematurely. So, that’s my story.

0:14:22.9 WB: And what was the transition into where you are now in coaching business advisory? How did you make that transition?

0:14:33.0 EC: It wasn’t conscious. It wasn’t something that I chose. And there’s one learning that I always share, and I want really want your listeners to pay attention. You know the worst place you can be in your life when you don’t know what you want. And you don’t know where you are heading. It’s very easy for all of us to know what we don’t want. That as a breathe, but knowing what we want. Seriously, not what we want because somebody told us that this is what we should want, but what we want deep inside. And having this courage to accept it and move this direction and creating this destination you move towards that is not… Not many people actually pay attention to it or take it slow to discover it. And I appeared to be in a situation where I was totally aimless.

0:15:33.6 EC: I knew that I don’t want to be employee anymore. I never wanted to be like a big director of a big corporation, but I didn’t know what I wanted to be, what I wanted to do. And it’s really not a nice place to be in because it’s a downward spiral because it starts from your head because yeah, you have no direction, but obviously it’s end up in your behavior, right? So, the whole life goes in a totally wrong direction where you aren’t supposed to be and I move to a different country because I thought that I will start a new life over there.

0:16:13.8 EC: But I didn’t know that I was moving to go through the period of deep transformation. I was unconscious. Yeah. So, I didn’t know about it. And this is how it happened. So, when I went through this transformation and I appeared to be a totally different person at the end of it, I was already writing the book. And one morning I woke up and I got to download that I’m going to be a coach. Because I didn’t know what I would be doing. I had no idea, so I knew that I’m done with employee, role of employee and that was it. And that was blank unless I had this download. And it felt like that is said, this is exactly my dream of what I would like to do. That is how it felt.

0:17:10.6 WB: Yeah. Great story. We have a couple of things in common, one of which is that when we talk about learning, you do a lot of short programs. I think you refer to them as disjointed learning.

0:17:22.6 EC: Yeah.

0:17:22.9 WB: I also focus on the things I have an interest in. I’m not a degree person. I don’t commit to three years studying a topic. So, I like to really hone in on things that I have an interest in them. And therefore I have a very broad base of knowledge. And it seems, looking at your list, you are very similar in that regard, or albeit 10 times more than what I’ve done. [chuckle]

0:17:48.1 EC: Yeah. Because only through knowing different things and different opinions, you can create something yours, right? And that is actually the approach that I was trying to propagandate when I was in brand marketing. And it didn’t really work out, unfortunately.

0:18:05.9 EC: Because if you look at the companies and brands I worked with, I was trying to change industries because I thought that through accepting or adopting new industry, you’re gonna enrich your palette, right? Because you get different tips and tricks. And when you go into new industry, you have already so such a, I don’t know, repertoire of different techniques that you go from that you can use it. And you can always challenge. You can always challenge the category. You can always do something your own way. And I thought that actually it’s benefit from employer.

0:18:46.3 EC: No, it is not. Because when you start looking through job, descriptions like 25 years in this industry, I was like, “Don’t you get it?” Because you get one trick pony. This is the person that in-depth knows only one thing, right? And the funny is it just how the brain works, first of all, it gets rusty and secondly, you know it so well that there’s no need…

0:19:13.0 EC: You know to develop yourself because it also gets lazy. You conserve your brain, conserve some more energy with what you know. So, there’s no point of challenging. And I thought… I was having my conversation with my friend today that all my book, I’m having a go on beauty industry because it just really drives me mad. It doesn’t because nothing drives me mad, but it’s just a good expression. [laughter] So… And they only want people from beauty industry. And beauty industry has no brand marketing. They don’t know marketing.

0:19:46.1 EC: You know, just primitive features and attributes driven products. But, oh my God, that’s so posh. You know, we are beauty. We’re so royalty. You don’t even know how to differentiate your product and you’re royalty. And they want exactly this. And every industry wants exactly somebody with precise background. It was like yeah and how are you supposed to win on this market. You know how do you suppose to be seen if you’re all cloned but obviously, so didn’t work, didn’t work, tried.

[laughter]

0:20:21.6 WB: How has the study helped you in gaining deeper insights about yourself like has it given you light bulb moments or awakenings through the study or has that come through personal reflection?

0:20:37.2 EC: Yes, it really depends because by a certain time, you know, you’ve got so much knowledge that to have something that would be like, oh, wow, you know? It’s quite challenging just to come to this place. There was one course that absolutely I was under the influence of this course for probably 10 days. It was forgiveness. And it was so powerful. And I knew about forgiveness, but somehow the way the lady presented it, it just was so incredible. So, it really depends. And with regards to knowing myself. Well, first of all, I’m not shy of self-reflection. It doesn’t bother me. But it doesn’t bother me because I have healthy self-esteem, which is quite an achievement, I think, by itself.

0:21:25.3 EC: So, which means that whatever I discover about myself, it has no other meaning for me but to learn myself better and improve where I can improve. So, it doesn’t affect me apart from taking it as opportunity for growth. So, that was self-reflection and then a lot of things happen after the personal transformation where you start getting truth, you know, as you go and I’m talking to you and suddenly I have this kind of profound understanding of what life is and what people are. So, I don’t think part of my effortlessness thing. I don’t think because it’s unhealthy. So, I keep my mind empty as much as possible, which means that if something happens to me, it either happens through the conversation or happens as a download.

0:22:24.2 WB: I’m always conscious of the time, and I really wanna jump into the book. So, if we can, the book is called From Purpose to Profit. And as you say, it’s pretty much a strategy guidebook. What was the reason or your purpose behind writing the book?

0:22:42.2 EC: Before I realized that I’m not going back to corporate, I was looking for a job. I mean, many years, honestly ’cause I don’t give up, I’m persistent, I’m resilient. So, let’s go for it. And I went. And I had a lot of interviews. And due to the nature of my background, for every interview, I was preparing like a small strategy. I was analyzing the market competition. And because I was going across any possible industry, really I didn’t care because every time it was curiosity to understand their customer.

0:23:19.3 EC: Again, I’m talking about psychology. So, it was no difference. It made no difference to me. So, I talked to all companies across all possible industries, small companies, big companies, startups, corporates. I was trying to analyze from the way, you know, they represent themselves, what they are, what their brands, you know, stand for. And more often than not, I couldn’t figure it out. So, then I was coming for the interviews and asking the questions, asking the questions about values because, you know, I was trying to motivate myself because you’re supposed to come to the interview and say, guys, I want to really work for you. So, you know, it’s a kind of I’m easily self-motivated.

0:24:03.2 EC: I was looking at the values. I was talking about the brands and audience, and it was blank. I was looking to a wall. Values they really couldn’t care less often brand strategy when I was talking about brand strategy and often kind of pointing at mistakes obviously they didn’t like pointing at mistakes but they couldn’t understand what I’m talking about. Three or two times I was officially asked to send my interview presentation and once one company American company I will never forget it, they said to me directly we will use it to shape our own strategy you and I thought okay.

0:24:39.5 EC: So, I knew that they’re not going to take me. It was obvious from the very beginning. There was something shady about the process. So, probably they were just collecting information from the candidates. I thought okay. Do I really argue or do I send the presentation, you know? It was easier for me to send the presentation and just throw them out of my life instead of having you know kind of. It was more for my mental you know emotional peace. And so, and basically it’s… Oh, what’s once it was amazing. Another interview was a marketing director and two, her direct reports. So, the first part of the interview, she was asking me questions about… And the second part of the interview, because I basically explained what they’re doing wrong, her direct report started asking me what they should do.

[laughter]

0:25:31.3 EC: To improve the business situation. And she was sitting behind and like “Okay, so I’m not selected.” [laughter] So, that was absolutely fascinating. And you know at some point I kind of realized that actually I know something that apparently doesn’t… Other people don’t. So, that was a revelation because I lived in the world that is kind of, “This is how things are supposed to be.” So, I started writing it and at some point I also decided to check with HBR contributors and I found articles of the most renowned professors. And when I saw that they say exactly the same what I think about brand marketing strategy, it somehow made me believe that actually what I know is actually high quality material and somehow 95% of organizations are wrong because I believe the HBR professors, a little bit more, are also knowing the struggle that businesses go through. And this is how I started writing the book because I wanted to share everything that I know in a very practical manner because I went through it with all the findings and all the learnings but at the same time I realized that I’m not a professor of Harvard, right? So, I had to know kind of my place.

0:26:55.3 EC: So, this is why I started adding a lot of numbers. You know, research numbers, statistics, to have rationale behind my recommendations. So, they don’t sound subjective, but they are really objective and founded on numbers. It’s like this famous why rationale that a lot of companies and industries and gurus miss when they go for how to. So, my book is built on why, so people understand and learn what is right and what is wrong, knowing the rationale behind it. And also the book was full of quotes from all these professors and famous people because I wanted to add value and say, “Guys look. I’m not the only one. This person also think.” But for copyright reasons, I couldn’t apparently feature even short quotes, which was a surprise to me because I thought that actually I feature this people and I do something good. But apparently… So, I had to replace them with my quotes. That was a bugger [laughter] ’cause I really wanted to have what’s like a point of difference like a differentiation feature you know, empowering quotes, because my quote is not and nearly as good as like somebody like Steve Jobs but…

0:28:25.3 WB: Yeah.

0:28:25.8 EC: So…

0:28:26.8 WB: Well, I enjoyed reading many of them, so. In the first chapter of the book, you introduced this profitability flow framework when you speak about… Or you speak about several of the pillars throughout the rest of the book. Given that we have probably 10 minutes left, I wonder if you could explain the framework itself and then whichever are the key pillars or whether it’s the foundation you choose, but what is the key element of this flow framework, profitability flow framework?

0:29:00.3 EC: Okay. Yeah. Thank you very much for asking that. We will talk about pillars because when I start talking about foundation usually we’re running out of time. [laughter] You know when I can’t cover it. So, to avoid being in it, there is a foundation, trust me. Because you can’t build anything without a foundation. So, it exists. But on top of, we have these pillars that I recommend, I suggest businesses pay attention to to achieve profitability. So, the first thing to understand, that profitability is not return of investment. They are totally different concepts. And return on investments, it’s about now. It’s about short term thinking. It’s about getting out of the business as much as you can. You know pretty much screwing it because often you will be left with not much left out of your business. Profitability is a long term planning. It’s your destination. That is where you want to be. And it’s longevity and sustainability of your business. So, they’re totally different concepts. And I’m talking about profitability.

0:30:07.0 EC: So, the first thing that the business must have, for the sake of a better word, it’s strategy. It’s not about tactics. It’s not about changing directions. It’s not about running like a headless chickens trying to figure out what I’m going to do next if I have enough money left, you know. It is about having a strategy. And this is prerogative. Because I don’t believe you can have sustainable business without it. It’s like I always say, you know, that if… “Why nobody questions the need for strategy in the war and why we believe that strategy is redundant in the marketplace where there is a fight for every share point?” That is a must. Next must, actually, people. And this is something that also I find fascinating. Everybody knows about employees and you know. But people, they’re not just employees. You won’t have your business without people. People are customers or clients or consumers. Understand them. Understand that they are human beings. You know? They’re not just avatars. They are human beings and you won’t exist if they didn’t exist and didn’t pay for your business. People are employees, yes. And you won’t exist if you didn’t have them.

0:31:34.5 EC: Or if you don’t want to have them do it yourself. There are always options, but if you take people on board, it means that you can’t survive without them. So, respect them and appreciate them as human beings. And the third group are partners. And I want to talk about partners specifically because when I was working with advertising creative agencies, we are always were friends with, I always was friends with them.

0:32:03.2 WB: Right.

0:32:04.1 EC: But, oh my God, other businesses, how these poor guys mistreated. They work 24/7. They’re taken for servants. They have their own business in fairness, and yes, they help you out, but they’re always treated with so much disrespect. It’s incredible, right? So, your partners, they are human beings. And, again, you can’t have a business without them because if you can, don’t work with partners, do everything by yourself. They’re always choice.

0:32:42.0 EC: So, these people are all these groups of people, they are enablers. So, they have to be taken and appreciated as such. Then we talk about leadership, and don’t even get me started because we can have another conversation about toxic leadership, about dozens, hundreds of dozens of podcasts talking about leadership where nothing is changing, nothing. You know, we all talk about it. Everybody knows how to do it right? But we don’t know how to do it right? Because we don’t want to. We don’t want to change. And you know it better than anybody else. People don’t wanna change, right? So, leadership is a prerogative. You know, you can’t have a business without leadership. I mean, proper, whatever proper means for everybody’s different, but leadership that ignites and enables people to be better, to contribute, that creates an ambiance where people want to perform. They take pleasure from doing it.

0:33:37.9 EC: And that’s gonna make your business so much more effortless because everybody will enjoy making your business better instead of you controlling and imposing, you know, coming from a negative energy. So, leadership is pillar number three. Then we have implementation. Implementation is actually, it’s a funny one because there is a… We need to understand that even a sound strategy can be messed up with poor implementation, right? And this is something I also noticed companies don’t do right? If you look at Kaizen, they actually suggest that every person on their place improves daily. So, when there’s opportunities to improvement, every person has this power authority to change the process to make it better. It’s one thing that we don’t do. Another thing that we don’t do, it’s either too much bureaucracy or there’s no structure whatsoever, right? The process and the structure of implementation, it has to ease your life.

0:34:48.1 EC: You need to know where to go, what to do, who to call because it has to be clear and structured and has to be transparent, right? It’s not rocket science, but if you don’t have it, what will happen together with poor leadership, no strategy? This is the famous burnout that we’re all talk about.

0:35:07.2 WB: Yeah.

0:35:08.9 EC: Right? And the way I explain it, it’s really easy, right? You just look at your implementation, you create your strategy, right? You appreciate people for human beings. It’s not rocket science. I’m not saying anything that is like too complex to implement. And we have two more pillars. The further number four is contribution. And contribution, so say that purpose is strategic, contribution is tactical, but the whole go hand in hand. And why these two are important, these two are important and purpose actually is part of the foundation thing. So, we’ll still touch upon it.

0:35:49.4 WB: Yes.

0:35:49.7 EC: These two are important because, first of all, it is, they’re strongly linked to mental health. It’s resilience. It’s motivation. It’s knowing something bigger. You know, it’s joining people together in the same effort that all the things that we don’t really pay attention to. But when we have something bigger than just profit, that brings us more satisfaction. Actually, it is easier on our mental health to progress within that. It also creates a different ambience. You will get people that burn together with your purpose, with your direction, right?

0:36:35.4 EC: You’re gonna get like-minded people joining the company and your retention rate gonna be better. And the quiet quitting is not going to happen. Just let people contribute so they feel being part of this movement. That is so simple. Again, but I guess it’s simple when you have something, when you believe that contribution is required, and from the external perspective, it’ll grow your brand because your reputation will improve. You know, your perception by external stakeholders is going to improve your customers. You’re gonna be able to build that emotional connection with your customers, clients, and consumers when they have something more than just your product. So, this is loyalty because loyalty is not about loyalty schemes, loyalty is about trust and building strong connection. And okay, not go about final analysis. And the six one is actually personal growth.

0:37:35.0 WB: Right.

0:37:35.1 EC: That’s the six pillar because we’re not talking about, again, rusty mindset. We’re not talking about people that don’t wanna progress. We talk about people who want to get better, who want to make their business better, who want to grow. And growth mindset is mandatory because lots of issues with toxic leadership and toxic abuse actually come from fixed mindset, personal insecurities.

0:38:01.2 EC: You know, personal need for approval, personal lack of knowledge, inability to accept. I mean, there’s so many things that we experience right now that come from fixed mindset.

0:38:13.4 WB: Yes.

0:38:13.7 EC: So, yeah, our mindset is another six pillar. And if you just work on each of them, first of all, you gonna improve your business holistically.

0:38:23.0 WB: Right.

0:38:23.4 EC: You know, not one stream, all of them, your business gonna flourish. You are not paying attention to the goal that is heavy, but you’re paying attention of seeing your business better, better and better. And what do you think profitability will come? It’s inevitable. It can’t be other way.

0:38:39.2 WB: Right.

0:38:40.2 EC: It’s just so easy.

0:38:42.4 WB: Is there anything we haven’t addressed today that you would like to that you think’s important, particularly around the journey to effortlessness?

0:38:51.4 EC: One of the thing that I keep on thinking and why I believe in my coaching methodology, although it may sound scary to some people, we are much better human beings that we think we are. We are so much often afraid of retrospection because we believe we discover something that we don’t like about ourselves. So, here is the truth, and I swear by it, whatever we don’t like about ourselves, it is not who we are. This is who we believe we are through conditioning.

0:39:34.2 WB: Right.

0:39:35.4 EC: Through adversary events and through not knowing how to process these adverse events in our lives. This is what we need to pass by to get to who we are because underneath we all are created this way. When we were born as babies, we’re all exactly same, right? We’re pure. So, when you take off this layer of whatever shaped you and you believe that this is you, it is not.

0:40:11.1 EC: So, you will come to purity. And from the place of purity, trust me, relationships are much better. The way how you handle life and adverse events is much better. Leadership comes naturally because you will stop thinking about yourself. You will start thinking about others and your business, and you will be leading from a totally different place. That is something that next time when we don’t feel good about ourselves, remember, this person you don’t feel good about is not who you are. You are much better. And let it just sit with you so you next time it makes you feel a little bit that there is a little bit of a light in the end of the tunnel. And yes, it is.

0:40:57.3 WB: That’s fantastic advice. What’s the best way for people to reach out and connect with you?

0:41:03.0 EC: Oh, the best way actually is to look at the show notes, listen to podcasts, and look at the show notes underneath. And there’s all information gonna be mentioned. Make it easy.

0:41:13.7 WB: Well, Erin, I’ve enjoyed the conversation. I’m sure everyone else that’s listening has. Thank you for taking the time.

0:41:20.8 EC: Well, I would like to thank you for two things. First of all, thank you for making me feel so special. And secondly, thank you for your questions because the whole thing isn’t about me, it’s about your listeners and the question that you asked. I hope it gave them some information, some insight, or something to reflect on. And that is the most important. If my message resonates and there’s something that they remember about it, that means that, you know, the time was well spent. And I really appreciate you for asking your questions.

[music]

0:41:55.0 S2: Thank you for joining us on the ET project, a show for executive talent development. Until next time, check out our site for free videos, eBooks, webinars and blogs at coaching4companies.com.

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