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ET-104: Building a Visionary Life: Aligning Personal Values with Business Success

With Mr. Daniel Hauge

ET-104: A conversation with Mr. Daniel Hauge

and your host Wayne Brown on June 4, 2024

Episode notes: A conversation with Mr. Daniel Hauge

Hello and welcome to the ET Project. I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and as usual, we’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world whom we’re affectionately referring to as Team ET. 

Today I’m visiting the central region of Denmark to chat with our guest Mr. Daniel Hauge. As well as being an entrepreneur, Daniel is a number one bestselling author with his book titled The Cure for Mediocrity, Create Wealth, Achieve Freedom, and Live the World Class Lifestyle. Incredibly, he released his book at the age of 17, that’s seven years ago, and he’s currently considering producing an updated version. 

From dropping out of high school and being involved in crime and drug abuse, to now being the founder of Passion 4 Achievement, Daniel leads an organization helping thousands of entrepreneurs around the world maximize performance in and out of business. He is obsessed with personal growth, entrepreneurship and the relationship between them.

Here is an extract from our conversation as we start to get into it…

That is a great question. I wouldn’t say there was one person that had an impact over it all. I would rather say I had one person that was really good for this and one person that was really good for that. I would say people like Brendon Burchard and Tony Robbins. They were kind of the first people that I got involved with personal development-wise. Then I followed Grant Cardone a lot for his wealth creation ideas. And then I kind of branched a little bit out from that as well. And I think just, so a lot of people, especially on podcasts and stuff, they will ask me, and it’s a great question, so I understand why they ask it. What’s the one book that you read that changed everything and what’s the one mentor or the one coach? For me, a lot of times it wasn’t that I read a hundred books and then five of them were incredible and the rest were useless…

Today’s Guest: MR. DANIEL HAUGE

Daniel believes everyone can build their vision of a world class life, and he aims to help as many entrepreneurs as possible achieve exactly that. He does this primarily through helping entrepreneurs optimize their productivity, focus, energy levels and systems and routines in and out of business so they can scale without the bad stress, overwhelm, burnout, and wasted potential. 

TEAM ET, among the many topics you’ll hear Daniel and I discussing from both personal and business aspects, we’ll chat about self-awareness and regulation, aligning personal values with your career, and what we can learn from studying successful people. Please join Daniel and me with our discussion around personal development and what it takes to become an entrepreneurial superstar.

Final words from Daniel:

One thing that I have changed my mind on recently, which I think is really good because we are talking a lot about personal growth and optimization and increasing productivity and these things. And that can also be a bit of a trap. It can be a bit addicting because you always wanna improve a little bit. And that’s okay. But one thing I’ve recently changed my mind on is this idea of optimization versus maximization. So I’ve always been an optimizer. I always wanted to kind of have my machine, whether that’s me personally or it’s my business, I always wanted to optimize it, make it better, make it more productive, make it more efficient. And I still do that. 

But my problem before was I was optimizing it to have the most optimized machine. So I’ll come back to that in a minute, but we all know the quote. Maybe, maybe we do. I love the quote. If I have six hours to chop down a tree, I’ll spend the four hours sharpening my axe. And I’m still going to sharpen my axe, I am, but I used to sharpen my axe to have the sharpest possible axe. Now I’m sharpening my axe to chop down the most amount of trees. So and this is actually from Hormozi, he said, everyone is trying to get the most bang for their buck, but sometimes it’s just about getting the most buck.

And I really like that. So the difference is once again, I no longer aim to have the sharpest axe. I aim to chop down the most amount of trees. So I’ll still sharpen my axe, I’ll still get my sleep, I’ll still eat right, I’ll still make sure my values are aligned with what I’m doing, I’ll still do all the productivity hacks, all these things. But the goal is now to produce actual results. It has to be tied to something, has to be tied to more leads, more sales, more value, more impact, more health, more muscle mass, less body fat. It has to be tied to a specific result and it should be for the result’s sake. 

And the reason I’m saying this, because you said over the next few years, a lot of entrepreneurs will emerge and a big bunch of those will get addicted to learning about things and optimizing their marketing over and over and over again. And you will meet them and you will say, Hey, you’ve been marketing for two years. I’m going to at least do that. Well, I’ve got three, but I still need to optimize this one headline or whatever. Optimize, but do it with intention to actually achieve the result that you want…

[music]

0:00:07.2 Wayne Brown: Hello, I’m your host, Wayne Brown, and welcome to the ET Project. We’re delighted to be delivering this podcast for executive talent all over the world, whom we’re affectionately referring to as TMET. Today I’m visiting the central region of Denmark to chat with our guest Mr. Daniel Hauge. As well as being an entrepreneur, Daniel is a number one bestselling author with his book titled The Cure for Mediocrity, Create Wealth, Achieve Freedom, and Live the World Class Lifestyle. Incredibly, he released his book at the age of 17, that’s seven years ago, and he’s currently considering producing an updated version. From dropping out of high school and being involved in crime and drug abuse, to now being the founder of Passion 4 Achievement, Daniel leads an organization helping thousands of entrepreneurs around the world maximize performance in and out of business. He is obsessed with personal growth, entrepreneurship and the relationship between them.

0:01:05.8 WB: He believes everyone can build their vision of a world class life, and he aims to help as many entrepreneurs as possible achieve exactly that. Daniel does this primarily through helping entrepreneurs optimize their productivity, focus, energy levels and systems and routines in and out of business so they can scale without the bad stress, overwhelm, burnout, and wasted potential. TMET, among the many topics you’ll hear Daniel and I discussing from both personal and business aspects, we’ll chat about self-awareness and regulation, aligning personal values with your career, and what we can learn from studying successful people. Please join Daniel and me with our discussion around personal development and what it takes to become an entrepreneurial superstar.

0:01:57.6 Speaker 2: Welcome to the ET project, a podcast for those executive talents determined to release their true potential and create an impact. Join our veteran coach and mentor Wayne Brown as we unpack an exciting future together.

0:02:14.4 WB: Hello, team ET, Good morning, good afternoon, good evening, wherever you are today, it’s great to have you join us for this discussion around, let’s say life’s choices and the way that we deal with developing ourself. And we have with us our guest, Mr. Daniel Hauge, 24 years old, incredibly young compared to me, somewhat of a 40 year gap. In actual fact Daniel, you are very much focused on personal development, and I know we’re gonna get into that as well as how that supports your clients who predominantly, I guess, are online entrepreneurs. So we’re gonna be bouncing around that topic a bit today. You have an interesting background. You’ve done a number of things already for such a young age, and I’m gonna be curious to understand how you’ve managed to do it all, given that I’m now 64, not 24, so [chuckle] I think we’ll have some fun with that, welcome to the ET project, Daniel.

0:03:15.9 Daniel Hauge: Thank you so much, and thanks for having me. I have no doubt this will be a great conversation. I’m super excited.

0:03:21.0 WB: Let’s start with the background. We always start with the background. Let’s kick off there and share as much as you’re comfortable sharing from where it started for you to where you are now.

0:03:32.3 DH: Absolutely. Yeah, so I started off off track in life, you could say I had some trauma in the family and this kind of pushed me off track. So very early I started partying with the wrong people, started skipping school, started getting involved in a little bit of crime, a little bit of drug abuse, and these things would just kind of gain momentum. They would just spiral in a very negative way. And so throughout much of my childhood and certainly my early teens, middle of my teens, I was on a very wrong, on a very, very… On a bad path you could say. And I realized that this was not gonna end well if I continued down this path. In fact, I share this story. I was with some of my friends at a vacation house, summer house, whatever you call it.

0:04:18.6 DH: And these were the people that I was involved with in terms of drugs and crime and we were just, the plan was to just party the entire weekend and that’s what we did. And I remember sitting in a circle at one of the nights we were there and someone came up with a fun little game. They said, hey, let’s, try and guess how old we’re gonna be, how far do you think you’re gonna make it in life? Some people said, well, I think I’ll be 85. And some people said, well, I think I’ll be 90. And it came to my turn, and then they looked at me and I completely killed the mood because I just with a stone cold face, I said, 21. And everyone was like, no, come on Danny.

0:04:55.8 DH: What do you mean? I said, there’s no way, the way I’m going now, just getting involved in car crashes and crime and violence and drugs, and there’s no way I’m making it past 21. And this scared me. And it was kind of a wake up call. Not for me. I wasn’t interested in life at all. I’ve, to me, life didn’t seem like a very interesting deal. Now, today as a business owner, I’m all about deals, right? What’s the value I get in exchange for the value I give? Life didn’t seem to be a very good deal. For me, life seemed to be a lot of sacrifices, a lot of pain, a lot of trauma, a lot of…

0:05:34.4 DH: And not a lot of good. So I wasn’t super interested in life, but I had a mother, I had a little brother that I wanted to stick around for. And so I decided that either I’m gonna give up on life, which wouldn’t be fair to them, or I’m gonna build a life that would truly be worth living. And so I decided on the latter, unfortunately… Fortunately, I mean. And so I started just going all in. I started getting jobs, I started working out, I started really consuming a lot of personal growth. And that’s why I like to say, even though things like entrepreneurship have really gotten access to my heart in my later years. I love entrepreneurship, I love business. Personal growth is truly what started it all and what kind of saved me. I would wish for Christmas and birthdays. I would be wishing on, wishing for personal growth books and all these things. And so that’s when my journey started with building the life that I thought would be worth living.

0:06:33.4 WB: You make that transition sound almost a given, but I can’t imagine it that it was that easy to transition from where you were to the new person. I can imagine there was many struggles.

0:06:48.2 DH: Yeah, I don’t think any percentage of that was easy. I think it was very difficult and much of it was also a little bit of back and forth. So I would start taking care of my health and then I kind of relapsed into some unhealthy patterns. And then I’d go back to the health. So a lot of overlap. So some people will say, “Well, if you were at this age when you started going all in on personal growth, why do you have stories of crime or drugs from this later age?” There’s an overlap. It’s not like in the movies you just have this revelation and then the next scene…

0:07:22.2 WB: Conscience.

0:07:23.8 DH: Exactly. Everything’s different. But that was when I started understanding what I was moving towards, and that was very important. And obviously a ton of mistakes, a ton of relapse and all of that. But it increasingly, when you have a graph, it’ll go down sometimes, but there’s a trend, and the trend was very clear that I was building a better life and I was getting happier, I was getting healthier and…

0:07:47.4 WB: You seem to have made a decision quite early though, around, I guess around 16 or 17, looking at the age of your business, which is Passion 4 Achievement. You started that around 16, I think, if I understand correctly.

0:08:04.2 DH: Yes. So what happened was I started very quickly seeing some positive results from personal growth, and I wanted to share those findings. I didn’t wanna step forward and say, “Look at me, I’m the expert. I have 40 years of experience.” And because I wasn’t the expert, and I still wouldn’t call myself the expert with 40 years of experience, because that would be tricky when I’m 24, having 40 years of experience. And so what I wanted to do was step forward and say, “Look, this is where I was, and I’m certainly not where I wanna be yet, but I have moved in this way and this way and this way.” What helped me was this thing and this thing, you can try it out. And I would just write these things in free PDFs or in free videos. I’d just share it. Not so much like an expert, but more as a student I’d like to share what’s working for me because it had so massive effects on me.

0:08:55.1 DH: And then that’s when I started Passion 4 Achievement, I bought the domain, stuff like that. But I wouldn’t really say it was a full-blown business for the first at least… And that’s difficult once again, ’cause I go back and forth, and then sometimes maybe I was profitable enough to do it full time and then maybe a bunch of years after that I had to supplement with some job income, stuff like that. Anyway, I wanted to share what was working for me, and that’s basically what I’ve been doing ever since.

0:09:26.7 WB: Yeah, fantastic. And I read somewhere that as you were working in this direction, you become obsessed with studying successful people. You were reading about wealthy, influential people. I’m wondering, in that period, in that time, was there any one particular influencer that had a major impact on you? 

0:09:47.5 DH: That is a great question. I wouldn’t say there was one person that had an impact over it all. I would rather say I had one person that was really good for this and one person that was really good for that. I would say people like Brendon Burchard and Tony Robbins. They were kind of the first people that I got involved with personal development-wise. Then I followed Grant Cardone a lot for his wealth creation ideas. And then I kind of branched a little bit out from that as well. And I think just, so a lot of people, especially on podcasts and stuff, they will ask me, and it’s a great question, so I understand why they ask it. What’s the one book that you read that changed everything and what’s the one mentor or the one coach? For me, a lot of times it wasn’t that I read a hundred books and then five of them were incredible and the rest were useless.

0:10:37.4 DH: For me, it was, I read 100 books and 6% of that book and 30% of that book and 11% of that book really made the difference. So yeah. And also what I really like to do is not just consume information, but be very intentional about what I’m consuming. So if I am focused on scaling my company and I know that marketing is my bottleneck, then I’ll focus a lot of my efforts on bettering myself in terms of marketing. If it’s my productivity that’s lacking, I’ll focus on that. And that’s something I’ve gotten increasingly better at with time. I used to just read and consume and study everything that could possibly be of some kind of value, but now I’m more intentional about it. So that’s good.

0:11:18.9 WB: Yes. I think we’ve all been down that rabbit hole to some extent. I’m 40 years your senior, and I still have, I fall for that trap every once in a while. In terms of influencers or maybe to use the right term, mentors or coaches, do you have people that you currently lean on for support in what you’re doing? 

0:11:42.2 DH: Yes. So right now I’m a very big fan of Alex Hormozi. Maybe he doesn’t have the life that I want because he’s working from dusk and dawn every day. I like to have a little bit more of a lifestyle that also gives me the other areas of my life that I feel like are important and stuff like that. But I think his views on business are really, really good. There’s a guy that I actually followed for a lot of years when I first got started with entrepreneurship called Peter Buch. He’s not as big as many of the top business people, but he has this mix of entrepreneurship and lifestyle design and personal development. And that was when I got started thinking of myself as this link between personal growth and entrepreneurship. Because in the beginning when I started Passion 4 Achievement, I wanted to talk about everything personal growth related, everything to everyone.

0:12:35.7 DH: So I wasn’t specific on my audience or on the problems I was solving or anything like that I just wanted to talk about personal growth. But with time, as I got increasingly more interested in entrepreneurship and being an entrepreneur myself and understanding the struggles from that, I started seeing myself as this link between the personal growth and the high performance, the productivity stuff, and the business side of things. And I think I learned that from Peter Buch, yeah.

0:13:02.7 WB: Okay. The audience probably doesn’t know what it is you’re doing or what your current interest is within this space, so maybe if you can fill that gap as a starting point and we’ll build from there.

0:13:15.4 DH: Absolutely. So like I said in the beginning, it was just all kinds of personal growth for everybody. With time, I started noticing that a lot of my clients and customers and the ones that were getting the best results were all entrepreneurs. And so I started focusing more on those. Also because I’m an entrepreneur myself, and so I can relate a little better to their struggles and their challenges in terms of performance versus if someone is a lawyer or a banker. So I focused on helping entrepreneurs, more specifically online entrepreneurs. Oftentimes they’re at the six, seven figure mark, so it’s not 80 employee companies, but more so. And what we do is we help them perform, basically. So we help them with their productivity, their focus, their energy levels, their systems or routines, how are they working on what and how and when.

0:14:04.4 DH: And then also what we do is we set things up in business and outside of business in a way that we can eliminate or at least drastically reduce things like burnout, overwhelm, stress, confusion, lack of focus. So I believe in business it’s very often, if not always, input equals output. So what you put in is what you’ll get out. And what I like to say is we basically help you scale the input.

0:14:33.8 WB: So you amplify it so that the results you receive is greater as a result, right? 

0:14:40.5 DH: Exactly. Because the way I feel, a lot of entrepreneurs, we know, if we’re being honest with ourselves, we know what we need to do to get leads, we know what we need to do to get sales. We know what we need to do to get on podcasts like this. I need to do podcast outreaches, so I need to build relationships with podcasters like I did with you. So oftentimes we know what we need to do. And I think sometimes in entrepreneurship, we just talked about shiny object syndrome and stuff like that. We all know it when we’re entrepreneurs and you’re scrolling on Instagram or wherever you’re scrolling, you’re bombarded with ads that says, “Hey, try this new Facebook strategy. It’s giving us 56 times [0:15:18.4] ____ rollouts right now. Or try this new way to generate leads. Or are you still doing email marketing? You should stop and do this thing instead.” Oftentimes, we know what we need to do, we’re just not doing enough of it or we’re not doing it well.

0:15:33.1 DH: And so that’s where I come in and I try to look at my experience as a business person, but also my experience as the habit, productivity, performance dude and see how can we make it so that whatever you’re doing for your lead generation, we can do that 10X or 50X in a way that is sustainable, effective, scalable, all these things.

0:15:57.1 WB: I know in the past there was a lot of focus on surrounding yourself with the right people, and I’m wondering how much you still endeavor to do that in the world that we live in today. So if you look at your own network, are the people you are surrounding yourself with the type of people that you feel you can leverage through their knowledge, you can leverage and gain yourself as well? 

0:16:23.5 DH: Absolutely. So I’m very, very conscious about who I spend time with and who I take advice from and who I surround myself with. Obviously, a lot of it these days are online, which can be okay, but I also try to get some actual network, go to events and conferences and stuff like that. But yeah, I would say I’m in pretty good place. The friends I had back then, they are, without going in too much detail, they are at the moment, they’re either dead or they are in rehab or they are sitting in prison for like 10, 12 year sentences. That’s the people I hung out with back then. Today, the people I hang out with, they’re on the, one of them is on the national team for biology and is doing the Olympics for biology. He’s a bioengineer, sorry, a bio entrepreneur and all these things. So my friends today are people that when I’m with them, I learn and hopefully they learn sometimes as well, but also I just I’m inspired and I always want to be more.

0:17:28.8 DH: And same thing when I’m dating and stuff like that, I wanna be more from having this person in my life. And so I’m very conscious about who I surround myself with.

0:17:37.3 WB: Yeah, there was a great quote I read somewhere related to you and you speak about it, but it comes from a Chinese philosopher, Zhuang Zhou I think, and I’m going to paraphrase because I can’t remember the whole thing, but it’s something like you can’t discuss the ocean with a well frog. His thinking is limited by the space that he’s living in. And I love that expression because it really summarizes what we’re talking about at this moment, but also my experience in life as well. If you surround yourself with the people that will help you grow, then you’ll grow as well. But if you surround yourself with people that don’t have that same perspective and don’t have those same interests, then you’re gonna spend a lot of your time being challenged perhaps or questioned, and they just won’t see the vision that you have. I think this is one of the fundamentals for me throughout my career as well. So I like that.

0:18:32.0 DH: Yeah, I love that as well. And so one of the things I talk about a lot is, and this is a very simplified statement, but I like the theory behind it, which is, “Your circumstances or your environment determine what you do. But you determine your environment.” And that sounds like a cliche Instagram quote, but I really like it because much of what you do is determined by what you hear. What are you listening to every day? What are you working on every day? What are you eating? How are you sleeping? Who are you… Are you at a cluttered desk or not? And for some people, they’re more productive with a cluttered desk and for some, but anyway, your environment is a very big predictor for how focused you can be and for how many distractions will be there and of how inspired you are and all these things. And so we humans don’t actually make a… We make a lot of decisions, but not as many as we think we do. A lot of it’s subconscious and it’s basically our environmental circumstances that determine a lot of things for us. But we can decide to set up certain things in the environment.

0:19:35.1 DH: So imagine you’re going to the grocery store and you’re extremely hungry. You can still decide not to buy any candy or biscuits or bad foods, but you’re very more likely to do that because you’re hungry. But you decide if you are hungry or not when you go to the grocery store. So you can set yourself up. And one of those things, environment-based things are the people that you surround yourself with. So make sure that’s set up.

0:20:03.4 WB: Yeah, to your point about the grocery store, you have to shift from the subconscious to the conscious and make that decision intentionally, right? You have an expression somewhere I read that says, life is 3% circumstances, 97% what you make of it. I always support that as well. There’s a lot of study around the concept of we live on autopilot 45-95% of our life, and it’s only when we’re very consciously focused on the things that are important that we choose with that conscious state rather than that subconscious mind. Used to talk about the importance of self-awareness. How does that factor into where you are today and the people that you are working with? 

0:20:51.1 DH: Yes. So self-awareness and having clarity on who you are and what you want and all these things is behind everything I do every day always and always will be. It’s the number one foundation. It’s the number one first step of all growth and progress and movement. The reason I started talking about it a little bit less is because people don’t find it sexy or interesting, but it is very necessary. So I’m glad you asked. So when I back then had to, when I decided back then that I was gonna build a life worth living, well, the question that comes to mind is what is a life worth living? What does that look like? And so I had to get very clear on my values. And so just to quickly go over what that could be, you could say, okay, my values in life are things like freedom. I wanna have self-respect, I wanna have my health, I’m wanna, yada, yada, yada. And then you can dive deeper and you can say, okay, freedom. What is freedom for me? Because for some people, maybe financial freedom is like 90% of their overall view of freedom. For others, maybe it’s a freedom of time.

0:21:54.1 DH: Or for me, a big part of freedom is freedom of location. Everything I’ve done today and will do today, I could have done from a cafe in Istanbul or a hotel in Tokyo. And that’s important to me. And that’s why I designed my life and business in a way where I would have freedom of location. So this is very important for every human being. So to know your values and to know what you actually want and get as specific as you possibly can. So when someone comes to me and they say, hey Daniel, I would like to have more money. Cool, here’s $3. You’ve won. What’s next? You know, what I would like to hear is, hey Daniel, I would like to go from 60k per month in revenue to 80k per month, and I would like to have a profit margin at 83% by doing this and that. You know, that’s…

0:22:36.3 DH: So let’s get a little bit more clear on what exactly we want. And so, like I said, it’s important for every person, but it’s very important for business people in general and for leaders in general because I see people that started companies because they wanted, let’s say freedom was the main value that they wanted to gain from their business, but now they’ve built an office culture that requires them to be in the office 60 hours per week. So now, they’re actively building something that is taking them away from what they truly wanted and what they truly want. And this will cause burnout and stress and all these things. So when I work with clients and we’re doing the reduce burnout, reduce stress work, a lot of it is actually these values here. And then also as a leader, when you understand how values work, you’ll have some salespeople that the number one thing for them is they wanna work from home so they can be with their daughter. And the next salesperson, he’s like a 22-year-old who just wants to make a bunch of money. Well, you give him some overtime so he can actually make that money, right? So you give people what they value and you’ll see their productivity, their inspiration and their initiative, all these things will just completely increase. So I think being self-aware and understanding your values, understanding your company’s values and understanding your people’s values is just such an important thing.

0:23:53.7 WB: Clarity, I guess, is like the overarching factor, that self-awareness. With the programs we deliver, we say self-awareness is step one. However, self-awareness provides you the knowledge, clarity. If you don’t do anything with it, then nothing changes. And we share a lot of common quotes, and one of them is from Bruce Lee, right? And he talks about knowing is not enough, we must apply. So for me, step one is self-awareness. Step two is self-regulation. So once I know who I am, what I am, what I wanna achieve, then I have to do something with that. And that then sets you off on the journey. Let’s say you always did the right thing, but at least you’re doing something and you’re building that momentum.

0:24:40.6 DH: And you said the password, which was momentum. Every time someone says that, I get so happy and I could talk about that for a year. Momentum is huge. And the self-regulation term is a really good term for that. But that is absolutely correct. Once you know where you’re going and you know where you are. So imagine you have a GPS, right? You’re on Google Maps or whatever, you put in the location of where you’re looking to go. So we have your destination, but we also need your starting point for us to actually have a route, right? If I say right now I wanna go to Manhattan and you know, the GPS doesn’t know where I’m starting from, it doesn’t matter. So we need to know where we are and where we’d like to go. And that’s what we talked about, the self-awareness, the clarity, all of that. And now we gotta do something that actually bridges the gap. I call it very, very creative, I call it bridge-the-gap-activities.

0:25:30.0 DH: And these activities, if possible, we can try and systemize those. And so systemizing these activities could be, so let’s say outside of business, let’s say you’re looking for, let’s say you’re looking to build a better life, a higher quality of life, and you identify one of the values that matter to you is health. Cool. Now we’ll dive deeper into the health value. What actually matters for me in terms of health? What gives me the health value? Well, one of them is having more muscle mass. Let’s say you’re a young man like me, you wanna have some muscle mass, maybe that that goes for everyone actually would like to have some muscle. Anyway, I know what kind of muscle I wanna have. I know what I have right now. What is something I could do that will bridge the gap? 

0:26:11.5 DH: These bridge-the-gap-activities are not hard to find in this day and age. Okay, we have more information than we’ve ever had. I promise, the lack of information is not gonna be what’s gonna hold you back. If you Google, you will have 500 exercises you can do to build muscle mass. So that part is not the tricky one. The tricky one is doing it consistently and sustainably and all that. So once we have an activity, we wanna systemize it. And the example I give is, if you have someone that says, I like to go to the gym when I have the energy and the time and it fits my schedule, and the stars are aligned perfectly and everything is just great, then I’ll go to the gym. You have someone else that goes, I’ll lift weights for 40 minutes on my way home from work on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

0:27:03.4 DH: What I’ve seen from my experience, I’m not a personal trainer or anything, but I’ve been in the gym for as long as I can remember, the person with the systems will, in three months, achieve the results that the person without them will achieve in sometimes five years. I’m not kidding. That’s not an over-exaggeration, I’ve seen it. And the same thing in business. A lot of people will go through their days and okay, now I’ll check a little bit of email. Okay, I guess now I’ll maybe reach out to to podcasts. Oh, now I have a client call, okay, now I’ll do this and that. What I really like to do is see if we can optimize a little bit of that. I know you can always go, okay, I only wanna have calls here or here or here. But when I wanted to get on podcasts, what I said was, okay, I’ll spend an hour every morning reaching out to podcasts. That’s the system. So I like to systemize the activities that will get me closer to where I wanna go.

0:27:47.7 WB: Right. I leverage a similar approach when we talk about our daily routines. So how do we standardize, systemize our routines? How do we make as much of it habitual so we don’t even have to think about it? And it happens, you know, as a matter of just going through the routine. So all of those factors sort of feed into each other, I think. So it sounds like we’re on, we’re very much on the same page. So we’re looking at the how to more so than just what it is we want to achieve and why. So we’re looking at how to do it and put it into practice. One of the things that I was reading about not in relation to you, but probably relevant to us in general in what we’re doing as entrepreneurs, is that there’s a forecast or a projection that by the year 2027, some 50-plus percent of the workforce will be either freelance, contract or entrepreneurial-based, which is a huge progression from where it is now, but also where it was. If you were talking to some of those people that were gearing up to move in this direction, any sort of advice you would give them about what do they need to be thinking about? Where should their head be at the moment about thinking about becoming an entrepreneur as they look at the world today with this hugely rapid, shifting, technological-based world we live in, what should they be thinking about at the moment, do you think? 

0:29:21.6 DH: Right. That’s a great question. So first I’ll go a little bit broad in general and then get a little bit more specific. So the broad general is understand just the things we already kind of talked about, understand who you are and what exactly you’re trying to build. A lot of people will, you know, kind of like we tell people not to marry the first person that touches their arm, a lot of people will marry the first business that they see a Facebook ad for. So, okay, I saw an ad for Forex Trading and so that’s what I will do. Or I saw an ad for e-commerce, that’s what I’ll do. I would really make the foundation, like for me, I would ask, I was asking myself like 100 questions per day for years when I started in the entrepreneurship. I was like, why is this important to me? Why is this not important to me? Why, how would I do this instead? And why did that ad feel bad for me? Well, this ad I was really impressed by and just really gaining that clarity. So that’s the first thing. And then understanding that slow can be faster than fast.

0:30:15.2 DH: What I mean by that is the fast route is eat this thing and you’ll eat 20 pounds in a day or buy my course, and you will have a $10,000 per day business from tomorrow. Or do this thing, you’ll be a gazillionaire next week. It never works. And even if it actually were to work, you wouldn’t learn any proper skills or any valuable lessons from it. And it wouldn’t be sustainable. It would… The foundation would be made of sand and it just, it doesn’t work. So you gotta be able to look a little bit more long term. And that’s different from having a job. If you have a job right now, you go in, you work for eight hours, you’ll have that pay either immediately or you’ll have it by the end of the month. It’s different for entrepreneurs. You’ll have to work sometimes for years without seeing a tangible result, so that, be prepared for that. The more practical stuff, I would urge you to follow, there’s a book called The One Thing by Gary Keller, I believe. It’s a really good book. And the idea is basically, there’s one thing right now you could be doing that would matter more than everything else. And everything that is not that thing is a distraction. So when you’re starting out as an entrepreneur, for me, the first many years I would perfect the color theme in my logo. I would be writing the 30th email in my autoresponder before having a single lead.

0:31:39.9 DH: I would, I promise you, don’t do that. That’s not the way. Just identify what’s the number one thing you could do right now. And if you don’t have an offer, the number one thing is to, in my opinion, find out what you’re gonna offer. We’re gonna help with how once you have that, start talking to people so you can have some kind of leads or conversations. Once you have that coming in, well, then you optimize your sales process. And then once you actually have a good enough sales process to have sales, well, then now you will have fulfillment, right? So how do I fulfill whatever I’m offering in an optimal way? How do I systemize that? Once you have that and you start having a little bit of a team, now I have operations, right? But if you start out by trying to perfect the operations that you will need in eight years, when you have 40 employees, that was literally my thought process. I would be going on walks and I’d be like, okay, in 12 years I will launch an app and this is gonna be the name for it. Do the number one thing that will actually get you closer to what you’re trying to do.

0:32:35.6 WB: Where is your vision at the moment for, I don’t know how far ahead you look now, but, you know, three years, five years, two years? 

0:32:44.1 DH: Right now I’m putting almost all my focus into my personal brand. So if you go and look at my personal profiles right now on social media, I have close to zero followers. I think I have 8000 followers on Facebook and something like that. But other than that, there’s nothing because I’ve always kind of been hiding behind Passion 4 Achievement. It was always Passion 4 Achievement, my Passion 4 Achievement products and logos and websites and ads and it was great ’cause I wanted to build a company, but now I’m really looking to focus on the personal brand more. So I will go hard on content creation, on media appearances like podcasts and stuff like that. So that’s the main focus for the next couple of years.

0:33:22.9 WB: When we look at entrepreneurialism, it’s such a broad field. Is there an area that you focus on when you meet with new clients, like how do you get them focused and centered after you meet them? 

0:33:36.3 DH: Yes. So, so first of all, we always get clear on what is it… Why are you here, basically? Why do you come to me? So there’s, they come to me because there’s something they would like to be doing or to have that they don’t have or they’re not doing. So we understand that gap, and sometimes it’ll be business related, it’ll be like, I don’t have enough leads. Then we’ll identify why and we’ll build systems around, okay, what’s something you can just pour your effective work hours into that will solve this problem. But other times it’s more so about, look, I actually, I enjoy my results in business right now, but my life is just crumbling. I have burnout, stress, I’m overwhelmed.

0:34:15.6 DH: I can’t sleep, all these things. Then we would look at more, once again, the gap we would look at what, would your ideal business or ideal work life look like? And how is it currently set up? We’ll look to systemize more stuff and we’ll look to… So there is a framework, but the steps vary a little bit depending on what the pain points are, but we always start with clarity always. And then basically we identify what are the activities that would help our situation. Then we build systems around it. And then we leverage momentum, which, like I said, you touched on that earlier, I love that word because momentum is huge, so we like to just get started, just do something that we have identified will actually solve the problem, but we just do very little of it. Especially if you’re already stressed or overwhelmed, you don’t want coach telling you to do four hours of this every day. We just do a little bit of it. Once that’s dialed in, so there’s a system, we know we’re doing something that’s effective and will give us the results that we want. You can scale that.

0:35:15.0 WB: Yeah, very good. You’re talking about content development and trying to grow your personal brand. Are you looking at books or anything at the moment? 

0:35:27.2 DH: Yeah. So the book that I wrote, The Cure for Mediocrity, I would really like to revise and to do a second edition of, and when I do, I will promote it heavily and see if I can kind of pay back to the followers that have been following and the customers that have been buying from me for years and stuff and kind of give that back, but also reach new people. I think that would be good for my brand, but it won’t be right now. So right now it’s just growing social media channels and basically sending everyone to my free trainings, my free PDFs and my daily content, obviously you can join as well for free. And then if you want to work with me, we can certainly talk about that as well. That would be like a hybrid of a course with me as a coach on the side.

0:36:12.9 WB: So what is the best place for people to follow or to find you? Which social media? 

0:36:19.7 DH: The best place is undoubtedly my Instagram @IamDanielHauge. So @IamDanielHauge, you can obviously get daily content that is tailored to entrepreneurs. We will, I’ll be, our main focus on doing content is to increase your productivity, your effectivity or your systems in and out of business while reducing things like burnout and overwhelm. So, basically in very general terms, scale your business while feeling better and living a life worth living. So the content will be there. There will also be free stuff, so like free PDF on clarity, like we talked about today or other cool things. And then of course, on Instagram as well, you can just DM me if you have any interest in having my help or having me look at your situation, I’ll give you some pointers on what I think could help you. Maybe we have a talk about what could help you. So, but everything happens at Instagram @IamDanielHauge.

0:37:16.4 WB: Daniel, anything we should be talking about today that we haven’t touched on? Any specific message you’d like to give the listeners? 

0:37:24.8 DH: One thing that I have changed my mind on recently, which I think is really good because we are talking a lot about personal growth and optimization and increasing productivity and these things. And that can also be a bit of a trap. It can be a bit addicting because you always wanna improve a little bit. And that’s okay. But one thing I’ve recently changed my mind on is this idea of optimization versus maximization. So I’ve always been an optimizer. I always wanted to kind of have my machine, whether that’s me personally or it’s my business, I always wanted to optimize it, make it better, make it more productive, make it more efficient. And I still do that. But my problem before was I was optimizing it to have the most optimized machine. So I’ll come back to that in a minute, but we all know the quote. Maybe, maybe we do. I love the quote. If I have six hours to chop down a tree, I’ll spend the four hours sharpening my axe. And I’m still going to sharpen my axe, I am, but I used to sharpen my axe to have the sharpest possible axe. Now I’m sharpening my axe to chop down the most amount of trees. So and this is actually from Hormozi, he said, everyone is trying to get the most bang for their buck, but sometimes it’s just about getting the most buck.

0:38:42.4 DH: And I really like that. So the difference is once again, I no longer aim to have the sharpest axe. I aim to chop down the most amount of trees. So I’ll still sharpen my axe, I’ll still get my sleep, I’ll still eat right, I’ll still make sure my values are aligned with what I’m doing, I’ll still do all the productivity hacks, all these things. But the goal is now to produce actual results. It has to be tied to something, has to be tied to more leads, more sales, more value, more impact, more health, more muscle mass, less body fat. It has to be tied to a specific result and it should be for the result’s sake. And the reason I’m saying this, because you said over the next few years, a lot of entrepreneurs will emerge and a big bunch of those will get addicted to learning about things and optimizing their marketing over and over and over again. And you will meet them and you will say, Hey, you’ve been marketing for two years. I’m going to at least do that. Well, I’ve got three, but I still need to optimize this one headline or whatever. Optimize, but do it with intention to actually achieve the result that you want.

0:39:48.3 WB: Daniel, been great connecting with you. I have to say I’m a little bit in awe that at the age of 24, I’m trying to think what I was doing at 24, but I certainly didn’t have the clarity around business or the clarity of mind that you have, particularly if you look back over your life story, you know, in such a short period, you’ve really transformed yourself to where you are now. I’m sure there’s still a long way to go, but you’re on that journey and you’re carving a path that so many other people have never gone. Kudos to you and all the best for the outcome.

0:40:23.6 DH: Thank you so much. That means a lot to me. And I’m extremely grateful to be here and share my message and my story. So thanks for that.

0:40:32.1 S2: Thank you for joining us on the ET project, a show for executive talent development. Until next time, check out our site for free videos, ebooks, webinars, and blogs at coaching4companies.com.

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